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Title: Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions from wastewater

Abstract

Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions such as copper, cadmium, zinc, and chromium ions in aqueous solutions were studied with equilibrium isotherms and kinetic adsorptions. The maximum adsorptions of four heavy metals are 29.3 mg/g (Cu{sup 2+}), 30.73 mg/g (Zn{sup 2+}), 42.18 mg/g (Cd{sup 2+}), and 25.07 mg/g (Cr{sup 3+}), respectively. Particle sizes of sunflower stalks affected the adsorption of metal ions; the finer size of particles showed better adsorption to the ions. Temperature also plays an interesting role in the adsorption of different metal ions. Copper, zinc, and cadmium exhibited lower adsorption on sunflower stalks at higher temperature, while chromium showed the opposite phenomenon. The adsorption rates of copper, cadmium, and chromium are quite rapid. Within 60 min of operation about 60--80% of these ions were removed from the solutions.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Div. of Textiles and Clothing
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
624323
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research; Journal Volume: 37; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: Apr 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; WATER TREATMENT; AGRICULTURAL WASTES; WASTE PRODUCT UTILIZATION; ADSORBENTS; SUNFLOWERS; DEMETALLIZATION; COPPER; CADMIUM; ZINC; CHROMIUM; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; ADSORPTION; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; WASTE WATER

Citation Formats

Sun, G., and Shi, W. Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions from wastewater. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.1021/ie970468j.
Sun, G., & Shi, W. Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions from wastewater. United States. doi:10.1021/ie970468j.
Sun, G., and Shi, W. Wed . "Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions from wastewater". United States. doi:10.1021/ie970468j.
@article{osti_624323,
title = {Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions from wastewater},
author = {Sun, G. and Shi, W.},
abstractNote = {Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions such as copper, cadmium, zinc, and chromium ions in aqueous solutions were studied with equilibrium isotherms and kinetic adsorptions. The maximum adsorptions of four heavy metals are 29.3 mg/g (Cu{sup 2+}), 30.73 mg/g (Zn{sup 2+}), 42.18 mg/g (Cd{sup 2+}), and 25.07 mg/g (Cr{sup 3+}), respectively. Particle sizes of sunflower stalks affected the adsorption of metal ions; the finer size of particles showed better adsorption to the ions. Temperature also plays an interesting role in the adsorption of different metal ions. Copper, zinc, and cadmium exhibited lower adsorption on sunflower stalks at higher temperature, while chromium showed the opposite phenomenon. The adsorption rates of copper, cadmium, and chromium are quite rapid. Within 60 min of operation about 60--80% of these ions were removed from the solutions.},
doi = {10.1021/ie970468j},
journal = {Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research},
number = 4,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1998},
month = {Wed Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1998}
}
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