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Title: 'water splitting' by titanium exchanged zeolite A. Technical report

Abstract

Visually detectable and chromatographically and mass spectrally identified hydrogen gas evolves from titanium (III) exchanged zeolite A immersed in water and illuminated with visible light. Titanium(III) exchanged zeolite X and zeolite Y do not produce this reaction. A photochemically produced, oxygenated titanium free radical (detected by electron spin resonance) not previously described is the species in the zeolite that reduces protons to molecular hydrogen. The other product of this reduction step is a nonradical, oxygenated titanium species of probable empirical formula TiO4. Heating the spent oxygenated titanium containing zeolite A under vacuum at 375 C restores over fifty percent of the free radical. Unlike previously reported systems, heating does not restore the original aquotitanium(III) species in the zeolite. Thus a means other than heating must be found to achieve a closed photochemical cycle that harnesses visible solar energy in the production of molecular hydrogen. The titanium exchanged zeolite A does, however, lend itself to a thermolysis of water previously described by Kasai and Bishop. (Author)

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Utah Univ., Salt Lake City (USA). Dept. of Chemistry
OSTI Identifier:
6242231
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6242231
Report Number(s):
AD-A-059131
DOE Contract Number:  
N00014-75-C-0796
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION; ION EXCHANGE; OXYGEN; PHOTOLYSIS; TITANIUM OXIDES; WATER; ZEOLITES; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CRYOGENIC FLUIDS; DECOMPOSITION; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; INORGANIC ION EXCHANGERS; ION EXCHANGE MATERIALS; MINERALS; NONMETALS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS; TITANIUM COMPOUNDS; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS 080100* -- Hydrogen-- Production; 400105 -- Separation Procedures

Citation Formats

Kuznicki, S.M., and Eyring, E.M. 'water splitting' by titanium exchanged zeolite A. Technical report. United States: N. p., 1978. Web.
Kuznicki, S.M., & Eyring, E.M. 'water splitting' by titanium exchanged zeolite A. Technical report. United States.
Kuznicki, S.M., and Eyring, E.M. Fri . "'water splitting' by titanium exchanged zeolite A. Technical report". United States.
@article{osti_6242231,
title = {'water splitting' by titanium exchanged zeolite A. Technical report},
author = {Kuznicki, S.M. and Eyring, E.M.},
abstractNote = {Visually detectable and chromatographically and mass spectrally identified hydrogen gas evolves from titanium (III) exchanged zeolite A immersed in water and illuminated with visible light. Titanium(III) exchanged zeolite X and zeolite Y do not produce this reaction. A photochemically produced, oxygenated titanium free radical (detected by electron spin resonance) not previously described is the species in the zeolite that reduces protons to molecular hydrogen. The other product of this reduction step is a nonradical, oxygenated titanium species of probable empirical formula TiO4. Heating the spent oxygenated titanium containing zeolite A under vacuum at 375 C restores over fifty percent of the free radical. Unlike previously reported systems, heating does not restore the original aquotitanium(III) species in the zeolite. Thus a means other than heating must be found to achieve a closed photochemical cycle that harnesses visible solar energy in the production of molecular hydrogen. The titanium exchanged zeolite A does, however, lend itself to a thermolysis of water previously described by Kasai and Bishop. (Author)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1978},
month = {9}
}

Technical Report:
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