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Title: Cohort mortality study of chemical workers with potential exposure to the higher chlorinated dioxins

Abstract

This cohort study evaluated mortality patterns, 1940 through 1982, of 2,192 chemical workers who, having engaged in the manufacture of higher chlorinated phenols and derivative products, had potential occupational exposures to chlorinated dioxins. Relative to United States white male mortality experience, there were no statistically significant deviations from expected for the following categories: all causes, total malignant neoplasms, or specific malignancies of particular interest: stomach cancer, liver cancer, connective and other soft-tissue cancer, the lymphomas, or nasal and nasopharyngeal cancer. For the cirrhosis of the liver category, internal comparisons demonstrated increasing trends associated with duration of employment in the Chlorophenol Production and Finishing areas; but available evidence suggests this finding was related to alcohol abuse. The study does not support a causal association between chronic human disease as measured by mortality and exposures to the higher chlorinated phenols, derivative products, or their unwanted contaminants, the chlorinated dioxins.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI
OSTI Identifier:
6240352
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: JOM, J. Occup. Med.; (United States); Journal Volume: 29:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CHEMICAL INDUSTRY; HEALTH HAZARDS; DIOXIN; TOXICITY; NEOPLASMS; EPIDEMIOLOGY; OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; DISEASES; HAZARDS; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; INDUSTRY; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC OXYGEN COMPOUNDS 560300* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology; 550900 -- Pathology

Citation Formats

Ott, M.G., Olson, R.A., Cook, R.R., and Bond, G.G. Cohort mortality study of chemical workers with potential exposure to the higher chlorinated dioxins. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Ott, M.G., Olson, R.A., Cook, R.R., & Bond, G.G. Cohort mortality study of chemical workers with potential exposure to the higher chlorinated dioxins. United States.
Ott, M.G., Olson, R.A., Cook, R.R., and Bond, G.G. 1987. "Cohort mortality study of chemical workers with potential exposure to the higher chlorinated dioxins". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6240352,
title = {Cohort mortality study of chemical workers with potential exposure to the higher chlorinated dioxins},
author = {Ott, M.G. and Olson, R.A. and Cook, R.R. and Bond, G.G.},
abstractNote = {This cohort study evaluated mortality patterns, 1940 through 1982, of 2,192 chemical workers who, having engaged in the manufacture of higher chlorinated phenols and derivative products, had potential occupational exposures to chlorinated dioxins. Relative to United States white male mortality experience, there were no statistically significant deviations from expected for the following categories: all causes, total malignant neoplasms, or specific malignancies of particular interest: stomach cancer, liver cancer, connective and other soft-tissue cancer, the lymphomas, or nasal and nasopharyngeal cancer. For the cirrhosis of the liver category, internal comparisons demonstrated increasing trends associated with duration of employment in the Chlorophenol Production and Finishing areas; but available evidence suggests this finding was related to alcohol abuse. The study does not support a causal association between chronic human disease as measured by mortality and exposures to the higher chlorinated phenols, derivative products, or their unwanted contaminants, the chlorinated dioxins.},
doi = {},
journal = {JOM, J. Occup. Med.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 29:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 5
}
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