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Title: Accelerators for heavy ion fusion

Abstract

Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6232971
Report Number(s):
UCRL-93555
ON: DE86002606
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; HEAVY ION ACCELERATORS; REVIEWS; COST; ELECTRICITY; HEAVY IONS; PLANNING; ACCELERATORS; CHARGED PARTICLES; DOCUMENT TYPES; IONS; 700208* - Fusion Power Plant Technology- Inertial Confinement Technology; 430100 - Particle Accelerators- Design, Development, & Operation

Citation Formats

Bangerter, R.O.. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion. United States: N. p., 1985. Web. doi:10.2172/6232971.
Bangerter, R.O.. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion. United States. doi:10.2172/6232971.
Bangerter, R.O.. 1985. "Accelerators for heavy ion fusion". United States. doi:10.2172/6232971. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6232971.
@article{osti_6232971,
title = {Accelerators for heavy ion fusion},
author = {Bangerter, R.O.},
abstractNote = {Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.},
doi = {10.2172/6232971},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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  • The goal accomplished in this project was to improve the Synergia code by improving the integration of the Impact space charge algorithms into Synergia and improving the graphical user interface for analyzing results. We accomplished five tasks along these lines: (i) a refactoring of the Impact space charge algorithm to make it more accessible by other codes, (ii) development of the Forthon interface between Impact and Python, (iii) implementation of a Python-MPI interface to allow parallel space charge calculation, (iv) a new user-friendly interface for analyzing Synergia results, and (v) a toolkit for doing parallel analysis of Synergia results.
  • This report presents point designs for a recirculating induction accelerator that will function as the driver for an inertial confinement fusion reactor power plant that produces about 1 GW of electric power for a lifetime of about 30 years. The idea of a recirculator has been previously proposed but no integrated driver system has ever been conceptually designed or evaluated. Our goal is to present design examples that meet the requirements set by target and reactor physics while minimizing the cost and maximizing efficiency. We wish to evaluate the feasibility of such an accelerator by performing a preliminary analysis ofmore » the major physics and engineering issues. A further goal is to compare the cost and efficiency of this point design with that of a linear accelerator, similarly designed using the same costing algorithms. During the preparation of this report, new issues continually arose and appropriate solutions were devised. At times, different weights were given to the often conflicting goals of low cost, high efficiency, high confidence of achieving high beam quality at the target, and high confidence in technological achievability. We have therefore arrived at many point designs, three of which are the subject of this report: Today's Technology Design. This design is the primary focus of the report, and it consists entirely of technology that could be built today or soon. The Low Cost/Advanced Technology Design. This design uses more advanced or alternative technologies to implement the recirculator concept. The Low Physics Risk Design. In this design, the driver system consists of several independent single-beam recirculators, rather than allowing several beams to share an induction core.« less
  • The commercialization of inertial confinement fusion is discussed in terms of power costs. A chapter on heavy ion accelerators covers the prinicpal components, beam loss mechanisms, and theoretical considerations. Other tyopics discussed include the following: (1) heavy ion fusion implementation plan, (2) driver with accumulator rings fed by an rf LINAC, (3) single pass driver with an induction LINAC, and (4) implementation scenarios.
  • This report presents point designs for a recirculating induction accelerator that will function as the driver for an inertial confinement fusion reactor power plant that produces about 1 GW of electric power for a lifetime of about 30 years. The idea of a recirculator has been previously proposed but no integrated driver system has ever been conceptually designed or evaluated. Our goal is to present design examples that meet the requirements set by target and reactor physics while minimizing the cost and maximizing efficiency. We wish to evaluate the feasibility of such an accelerator by performing a preliminary analysis ofmore » the major physics and engineering issues. A further goal is to compare the cost and efficiency of this point design with that of a linear accelerator, similarly designed using the same costing algorithms. During the preparation of this report, new issues continually arose and appropriate solutions were devised. At times, different weights were given to the often conflicting goals of low cost, high efficiency, high confidence of achieving high beam quality at the target, and high confidence in technological achievability. We have therefore arrived at many point designs, three of which are the subject of this report: Today`s Technology Design. This design is the primary focus of the report, and it consists entirely of technology that could be built today or soon. The Low Cost/Advanced Technology Design. This design uses more advanced or alternative technologies to implement the recirculator concept. The Low Physics Risk Design. In this design, the driver system consists of several independent single-beam recirculators, rather than allowing several beams to share an induction core.« less