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Title: Solutions for VOC and HAPS control on natural gas fired internal combustion engines

Abstract

Natural gas fired stationary internal combustion engines (IC engines) emit volatile organic compounds (VOC) and hazardous air pollutants (HAP) as part of their normal operations. VOC and HAP emissions are coming under increased scrutiny with the advent of such Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 regulations as Title I`s Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT), Title III`s Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) and Title V`s Operating Permit Program (Title V). In addition, many states are imposing more stringent emission limits on these sources. These emissions may also contribute to the reportable chemicals from the total facility under SARA Title III. Numerous facilities nationwide are interested in reducing these emissions in order to comply with current requirements, to opt out of requirements or to reduce reportable chemicals. This paper will examine the source of these emissions, and discuss combustion control technologies and system operating flexibility, end-of-pipe control technologies, and system tuning opportunities which have the potential to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from IC engines. Data will be presented on potential emission reduction efficiencies achievable using the various control options. 7 refs., 4 tabs.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Enviroplan, Inc., Roseland, NJ (United States)
  2. CNG Transmission Corp., Clarksburg, WV (United States)
  3. ENOx Technologies, Inc., Natick, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
621358
Report Number(s):
CONF-960273-
TRN: 98:002183-0018
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Air and Waste Management Association (AWMA) specialty conference on emerging solutions to VOC and air toxics control, Clearwater Beach, FL (United States), 28 Feb - 1 Mar 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Emerging solutions to VOC and air toxics control; PB: 457 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GAS TURBINE ENGINES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; VOLATILE MATTER; COMBUSTION CONTROL; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; PERFORMANCE TESTING

Citation Formats

Marcus, J.Z., Sleigh, S., and Cotherman, R. Solutions for VOC and HAPS control on natural gas fired internal combustion engines. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Marcus, J.Z., Sleigh, S., & Cotherman, R. Solutions for VOC and HAPS control on natural gas fired internal combustion engines. United States.
Marcus, J.Z., Sleigh, S., and Cotherman, R. 1996. "Solutions for VOC and HAPS control on natural gas fired internal combustion engines". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_621358,
title = {Solutions for VOC and HAPS control on natural gas fired internal combustion engines},
author = {Marcus, J.Z. and Sleigh, S. and Cotherman, R.},
abstractNote = {Natural gas fired stationary internal combustion engines (IC engines) emit volatile organic compounds (VOC) and hazardous air pollutants (HAP) as part of their normal operations. VOC and HAP emissions are coming under increased scrutiny with the advent of such Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 regulations as Title I`s Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT), Title III`s Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) and Title V`s Operating Permit Program (Title V). In addition, many states are imposing more stringent emission limits on these sources. These emissions may also contribute to the reportable chemicals from the total facility under SARA Title III. Numerous facilities nationwide are interested in reducing these emissions in order to comply with current requirements, to opt out of requirements or to reduce reportable chemicals. This paper will examine the source of these emissions, and discuss combustion control technologies and system operating flexibility, end-of-pipe control technologies, and system tuning opportunities which have the potential to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from IC engines. Data will be presented on potential emission reduction efficiencies achievable using the various control options. 7 refs., 4 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

Conference:
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