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Title: Decomposition of hardwood leaves grown under elevated O[sub 3] and/or CO[sub 2]

Abstract

We measured mass loss and N release from leaves of three hardwoods which varied in O[sub 3] sensitivity: O[sub 3]-tolerant sugar maple (Acer saccharum/SM), black cherry (Prunus serotina/BC), and putatively O[sub 3]-sensitive yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera/YP), grown in pots in charcoal-filtered air (CF), ambient O[sub 3], or twice ambient O[sub 3] (2X) in open top chambers. Mass loss was not affected by the O[sub 3] regime in which the leaves were grown. k values averaged SM:-0.707, BC:-0.613, and YP:-0.859. N loss from ambient O[sub 3]-grown SM was significantly greater than from CF; N loss from BC did not differ among treatments. Significantly less N was released from CF-grown YP leaves than from O[sup 3]-treated leaves. YP leaves from plants grown in pots at 2X O[sub 3] and 350 ppm supplemental CO[sub 2] in CSTRs loss 40% as much mass and 27% as much N over one year as did leaves from YP grown in CF or 2X O[sub 3]. Thus, for leaves from plants grown in pots in fumigation chambers, the concentrations of both O[sub 3] and CO[sub 2] can affect N release from litter incubated in the field whereas mass loss rate was affected only by CO[sub 2].

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States) Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Delaware, OH (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6202532
Report Number(s):
CONF-930798--
Journal ID: ISSN 0012-9623; CODEN: BECLAG
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America; (United States); Journal Volume: 74:2; Conference: 78. annual Ecological Society of America (ESA) meeting, Madison, WI (United States), 31 Jul - 4 Aug 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CARBON DIOXIDE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; LEAVES; DECOMPOSITION; OZONE; CHERRIES; MAPLES; PLANTS; POPLARS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; FOOD; FRUITS; MAGNOLIOPHYTA; MAGNOLIOPSIDA; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; TREES 560300* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Boerner, R.E.J., and Rebbeck, J. Decomposition of hardwood leaves grown under elevated O[sub 3] and/or CO[sub 2]. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Boerner, R.E.J., & Rebbeck, J. Decomposition of hardwood leaves grown under elevated O[sub 3] and/or CO[sub 2]. United States.
Boerner, R.E.J., and Rebbeck, J. 1993. "Decomposition of hardwood leaves grown under elevated O[sub 3] and/or CO[sub 2]". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6202532,
title = {Decomposition of hardwood leaves grown under elevated O[sub 3] and/or CO[sub 2]},
author = {Boerner, R.E.J. and Rebbeck, J.},
abstractNote = {We measured mass loss and N release from leaves of three hardwoods which varied in O[sub 3] sensitivity: O[sub 3]-tolerant sugar maple (Acer saccharum/SM), black cherry (Prunus serotina/BC), and putatively O[sub 3]-sensitive yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera/YP), grown in pots in charcoal-filtered air (CF), ambient O[sub 3], or twice ambient O[sub 3] (2X) in open top chambers. Mass loss was not affected by the O[sub 3] regime in which the leaves were grown. k values averaged SM:-0.707, BC:-0.613, and YP:-0.859. N loss from ambient O[sub 3]-grown SM was significantly greater than from CF; N loss from BC did not differ among treatments. Significantly less N was released from CF-grown YP leaves than from O[sup 3]-treated leaves. YP leaves from plants grown in pots at 2X O[sub 3] and 350 ppm supplemental CO[sub 2] in CSTRs loss 40% as much mass and 27% as much N over one year as did leaves from YP grown in CF or 2X O[sub 3]. Thus, for leaves from plants grown in pots in fumigation chambers, the concentrations of both O[sub 3] and CO[sub 2] can affect N release from litter incubated in the field whereas mass loss rate was affected only by CO[sub 2].},
doi = {},
journal = {Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 74:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 6
}

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