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Title: Automation of electron diffraction analysis in an analytical electron microscope

Abstract

This paper outlines the concept of gathering and analyzing electron diffraction patterns in an AEM by using a computer to digitally control the operation of a set of post-projector lens scan coils. By digitally controlling the deflection of a static selected area diffraction pattern either to a fixed reference point or in a reduced raster over the apertured STEM detector, a set of electronic signals may be generated which contain information of the form I = f(x,y). Not only can this signal be rapidly processed to provide real-time analyses of diffracted distances and angles of spots in the pattern, but also the operator maintains control over the scanning coils (via joystick) allowing only selected spots to be gathered and analyzed, thus facilitating the analysis of imperfect of multiple patterns. A description of the hardware and software is given, as well as preliminary results and current limitations.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Rockwell International Corp., Golden, CO (USA). Rocky Flats Plant
OSTI Identifier:
6199616
Report Number(s):
RFP-3188; CONF-810705-6
ON: DE81027255
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-76DP03533
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 16. annual conference of the Microbeam Analysis Society, Vail, CO, USA, 13 Jul 1981
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; ELECTRON DIFFRACTION; IMAGE PROCESSING; CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; DATA PROCESSING; COHERENT SCATTERING; DIFFRACTION; MICROSCOPY; PROCESSING; SCATTERING; 440300* - Miscellaneous Instruments- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Carr, M.J. Automation of electron diffraction analysis in an analytical electron microscope. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Carr, M.J. Automation of electron diffraction analysis in an analytical electron microscope. United States.
Carr, M.J. 1981. "Automation of electron diffraction analysis in an analytical electron microscope". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6199616,
title = {Automation of electron diffraction analysis in an analytical electron microscope},
author = {Carr, M.J.},
abstractNote = {This paper outlines the concept of gathering and analyzing electron diffraction patterns in an AEM by using a computer to digitally control the operation of a set of post-projector lens scan coils. By digitally controlling the deflection of a static selected area diffraction pattern either to a fixed reference point or in a reduced raster over the apertured STEM detector, a set of electronic signals may be generated which contain information of the form I = f(x,y). Not only can this signal be rapidly processed to provide real-time analyses of diffracted distances and angles of spots in the pattern, but also the operator maintains control over the scanning coils (via joystick) allowing only selected spots to be gathered and analyzed, thus facilitating the analysis of imperfect of multiple patterns. A description of the hardware and software is given, as well as preliminary results and current limitations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1981,
month = 7
}

Conference:
Other availability
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