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Title: Frozen-plasma boundary-layer flows over adiabatic flat plates

Abstract

The boundary-layer equations for a partially ionized frozen flow over a flat plate has been solved using a new approach in which the problem is reduced from a two-point boundary value problem to a Cauchy problem, thus offering a simple, stable, and relatively inexpensive solution technique. The method is applied to a strong shock-induced argon flow over an adiabatic flat plate. The dependence of the flow inside the boundary layer on the Prandtl number Pr, and Lewis number Le, and on the exponential dependence n of the density viscosity product on the temperature are explored, and it is found that while Pr and n strongly affect the obtained flow field, the influence of Le is negligibly small.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Negev Univ., Beersheva, Israel
OSTI Identifier:
6199102
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6199102
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIAA J.; (United States); Journal Volume: 22
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; ARGON; FLUID FLOW; PLATES; ADIABATIC PROCESSES; CAUCHY PROBLEM; SHOCK WAVES; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; GASES; NONMETALS; RARE GASES 420400* -- Engineering-- Heat Transfer & Fluid Flow

Citation Formats

Ben-Dor, G., and Igra, O.. Frozen-plasma boundary-layer flows over adiabatic flat plates. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Ben-Dor, G., & Igra, O.. Frozen-plasma boundary-layer flows over adiabatic flat plates. United States.
Ben-Dor, G., and Igra, O.. Sun . "Frozen-plasma boundary-layer flows over adiabatic flat plates". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6199102,
title = {Frozen-plasma boundary-layer flows over adiabatic flat plates},
author = {Ben-Dor, G. and Igra, O.},
abstractNote = {The boundary-layer equations for a partially ionized frozen flow over a flat plate has been solved using a new approach in which the problem is reduced from a two-point boundary value problem to a Cauchy problem, thus offering a simple, stable, and relatively inexpensive solution technique. The method is applied to a strong shock-induced argon flow over an adiabatic flat plate. The dependence of the flow inside the boundary layer on the Prandtl number Pr, and Lewis number Le, and on the exponential dependence n of the density viscosity product on the temperature are explored, and it is found that while Pr and n strongly affect the obtained flow field, the influence of Le is negligibly small.},
doi = {},
journal = {AIAA J.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 22,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1984},
month = {Sun Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1984}
}
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