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Title: Dispersants displace hot oiling

Abstract

Laboratory experiments and field testing of dispersants in producing wells have resulted in development of 2 inexpensive paraffin dispersant packages with a broad application range, potential for significant savings over hot oiling, and that can be applied effectively by both continuous and batch treating techniques. The 2 dispersants are soluble in the carrier solvent (one soluble in oil, one in water); are able to readily disperse the wax during a hot flask test conducted in a laboratory; and leave the producing interval water wet. Field data on the 2 dispersants are tabulated, demonstrating their efficacy.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6196456
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Drill Bit; (United States); Journal Volume: 33:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; OIL WELLS; DEWAXING; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; FIELD TESTS; PARAFFIN; REMOVAL; SURFACTANTS; ALKANES; HYDROCARBONS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; TESTING; WAXES; WELLS 020300* -- Petroleum-- Drilling & Production

Citation Formats

Wash, R. Dispersants displace hot oiling. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Wash, R. Dispersants displace hot oiling. United States.
Wash, R. 1984. "Dispersants displace hot oiling". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6196456,
title = {Dispersants displace hot oiling},
author = {Wash, R.},
abstractNote = {Laboratory experiments and field testing of dispersants in producing wells have resulted in development of 2 inexpensive paraffin dispersant packages with a broad application range, potential for significant savings over hot oiling, and that can be applied effectively by both continuous and batch treating techniques. The 2 dispersants are soluble in the carrier solvent (one soluble in oil, one in water); are able to readily disperse the wax during a hot flask test conducted in a laboratory; and leave the producing interval water wet. Field data on the 2 dispersants are tabulated, demonstrating their efficacy.},
doi = {},
journal = {Drill Bit; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 33:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 2
}
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