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Title: Biotransformation of selected organic pollutants in ground water

Abstract

Widespread contamination of ground water by a variety of synthetic organic compounds has created a need for information about the biotransformation of these contaminants in aquifers and associated regions of the unsaturated subsurface. Uncontaminated samples of the subsurface were taken from positions immediately above and below the water table at Pickett, OK, and Fort Polk, LA. Selected organic pollutants were added aseptically to the samples at an initial concentration of 1 mg/liter water. No degradation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, chloroform, or 1,1-dichloroethane was detected in any of the samples. Toluene and styrene was degraded slowly in samples from both positions at both sites. Chlorobenzene was degraded in samples from both positions at Pickett, but no degradation was detected in samples from Fort Polk. There was no detectable degradation of these three compounds in autoclaved samples. Tri- and tetrachloroethylene was degraded very slowly in some of the samples. These rates, however, were the same magnitude as published rates of chemical hydrolysis. Microbes in the deeper subsurface can degrade some, but not all, of the organic pollutants commonly encountered in ground water. 26 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Protection Agency, Ada, OK
OSTI Identifier:
6182565
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6182565
Report Number(s):
CONF-8208164-
Journal ID: CODEN: DIMCA
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
Dev. Ind. Microbiol.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 24; Conference: 39. general meeting of the Society for Industrial Microbiology, St. Paul, MN, USA, 14 Aug 1982
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CHLORINATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; BIODEGRADATION; GROUND WATER; DECONTAMINATION; STYRENE; TOLUENE; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; LOUISIANA; OKLAHOMA; WATER POLLUTION; ALKYLATED AROMATICS; AROMATICS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CLEANING; DATA; DECOMPOSITION; FEDERAL REGION VI; HALOGENATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; HYDROCARBONS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; INFORMATION; NORTH AMERICA; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; USA; WATER 520200* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Wilson, J.T., McNabb, J.F., Wilson, B.H., and Noonan, M.J. Biotransformation of selected organic pollutants in ground water. United States: N. p., 1983. Web.
Wilson, J.T., McNabb, J.F., Wilson, B.H., & Noonan, M.J. Biotransformation of selected organic pollutants in ground water. United States.
Wilson, J.T., McNabb, J.F., Wilson, B.H., and Noonan, M.J. Sat . "Biotransformation of selected organic pollutants in ground water". United States.
@article{osti_6182565,
title = {Biotransformation of selected organic pollutants in ground water},
author = {Wilson, J.T. and McNabb, J.F. and Wilson, B.H. and Noonan, M.J.},
abstractNote = {Widespread contamination of ground water by a variety of synthetic organic compounds has created a need for information about the biotransformation of these contaminants in aquifers and associated regions of the unsaturated subsurface. Uncontaminated samples of the subsurface were taken from positions immediately above and below the water table at Pickett, OK, and Fort Polk, LA. Selected organic pollutants were added aseptically to the samples at an initial concentration of 1 mg/liter water. No degradation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, chloroform, or 1,1-dichloroethane was detected in any of the samples. Toluene and styrene was degraded slowly in samples from both positions at both sites. Chlorobenzene was degraded in samples from both positions at Pickett, but no degradation was detected in samples from Fort Polk. There was no detectable degradation of these three compounds in autoclaved samples. Tri- and tetrachloroethylene was degraded very slowly in some of the samples. These rates, however, were the same magnitude as published rates of chemical hydrolysis. Microbes in the deeper subsurface can degrade some, but not all, of the organic pollutants commonly encountered in ground water. 26 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.},
doi = {},
journal = {Dev. Ind. Microbiol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = {1983},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
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