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Title: Thermoregulatory consequences of long-term microwave exposure at controlled ambient temperatures. Final report

Abstract

The study was designed to identify and measure changes in thermoregulatory response systems, both behavioral and physiological, that may occur when squirrel monkeys are exposed to 2450-MHz CW microwaves 40 hours/week for 15 weeks. Microwave power densities explored were 1 and 5 mW/sq. cm. (SAR = 0.16 W/kg per mW/sq. cm.) and were presented at controlled environmental temperatures of 25, 30, and 35 C. Standardized tests, conducted periodically, assessed changes in thermoregulatory responses. Dependent variables measured included body mass, certain blood properties, metabolic heat production, sweating, skin temperatures, deep body temperature, and behavioral responses by which the monkeys selected a preferred environmental temperature. Results showed no alteration of metabolic rate, internal body temperature, or thermoregulatory behavior by microwave exposure although the ambient temperature prevailing during chronic exposure could exert an effect. An increase in sweating rate occurred in the 35 C environment, not enhanced significantly by microwave exposure. Skin temperature, reflecting vasomotor state, was reliably influenced by both ambient temperature and microwaves. The most robust consequence of microwave exposure was a reduction in body mass which appeared to be a function of microwave power density.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
John B. Pierce Foundation of Connecticut, Inc., New Haven (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6177762
Report Number(s):
PB-84-236603
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; MICROWAVE RADIATION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BEHAVIOR; BODY TEMPERATURE; CHRONIC EXPOSURE; HOMEOSTASIS; LABORATORY ANIMALS; MONKEYS; PHYSIOLOGY; ANIMALS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; MAMMALS; PRIMATES; RADIATIONS; VERTEBRATES; 560400* - Other Environmental Pollutant Effects

Citation Formats

Adair, E R, Spiers, D E, Rawson, R O, Adams, B W, and Sheldon, D K. Thermoregulatory consequences of long-term microwave exposure at controlled ambient temperatures. Final report. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Adair, E R, Spiers, D E, Rawson, R O, Adams, B W, & Sheldon, D K. Thermoregulatory consequences of long-term microwave exposure at controlled ambient temperatures. Final report. United States.
Adair, E R, Spiers, D E, Rawson, R O, Adams, B W, and Sheldon, D K. Wed . "Thermoregulatory consequences of long-term microwave exposure at controlled ambient temperatures. Final report". United States.
@article{osti_6177762,
title = {Thermoregulatory consequences of long-term microwave exposure at controlled ambient temperatures. Final report},
author = {Adair, E R and Spiers, D E and Rawson, R O and Adams, B W and Sheldon, D K},
abstractNote = {The study was designed to identify and measure changes in thermoregulatory response systems, both behavioral and physiological, that may occur when squirrel monkeys are exposed to 2450-MHz CW microwaves 40 hours/week for 15 weeks. Microwave power densities explored were 1 and 5 mW/sq. cm. (SAR = 0.16 W/kg per mW/sq. cm.) and were presented at controlled environmental temperatures of 25, 30, and 35 C. Standardized tests, conducted periodically, assessed changes in thermoregulatory responses. Dependent variables measured included body mass, certain blood properties, metabolic heat production, sweating, skin temperatures, deep body temperature, and behavioral responses by which the monkeys selected a preferred environmental temperature. Results showed no alteration of metabolic rate, internal body temperature, or thermoregulatory behavior by microwave exposure although the ambient temperature prevailing during chronic exposure could exert an effect. An increase in sweating rate occurred in the 35 C environment, not enhanced significantly by microwave exposure. Skin temperature, reflecting vasomotor state, was reliably influenced by both ambient temperature and microwaves. The most robust consequence of microwave exposure was a reduction in body mass which appeared to be a function of microwave power density.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1984},
month = {8}
}

Technical Report:
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