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Title: Tc-NGA imaging in liver transplantation: preliminary clinical experience

Abstract

Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (Tc-NGA) is a new liver imaging agent that binds to hepatic-binding protein, a hepatocyte-specific membrane receptor. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of Tc-NGA imaging in clinical liver transplantation. A total of 25 studies were performed in nine patients. Imaging studies performed in the early posttransplant period in patients with good hepatic allograft function revealed diffuse patchiness in tracer distribution, a manifestation of preservation damage. Left lobar infarction was demonstrated within a few hours of ischemic injury. Right posterior segmental infarction was seen in another patient. Comparison of kinetic, clinical, and biochemical data revealed good correlation between hepatic allograft function and Tc-NGA kinetics. Major kinetic alterations were noted during periods of preservation injury, hepatic infarction, and acute rejection. These studies indicate: (1) major alterations in Tc-NGA kinetics occur during preservation injury, hepatic infarction, and acute rejection, and (2) Tc-NGA kinetic data appear to provide an accurate reflection of hepatic allograft function. Tc-NGA imaging has the advantages of being noninvasive and of utilizing standard nuclear medicine instrumentation, including portable imaging devices. In conclusion, Tc-NGA imaging provides a promising noninvasive approach for evaluation of liver function in patients undergoing hepatic transplantation.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Sacramento (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6173535
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6173535
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Surgery; (United States); Journal Volume: 105:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; GRAFT-HOST REACTION; DIAGNOSIS; LIVER; TRANSPLANTS; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; EVALUATION; ALBUMINS; ISOMERIC NUCLEI; ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS; PATIENTS; RADIOISOTOPE SCANNING; TECHNETIUM 99; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BODY; COUNTING TECHNIQUES; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DRUGS; GLANDS; HOURS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; ISOMERIC TRANSITION ISOTOPES; ISOTOPES; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; NUCLEI; ODD-EVEN NUCLEI; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; PROTEINS; RADIOISOTOPES; TECHNETIUM ISOTOPES; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES 550601* -- Medicine-- Unsealed Radionuclides in Diagnostics

Citation Formats

Woodle, E.S., Ward, R.E., Stadalnik, R.C., and Vera, D.R. Tc-NGA imaging in liver transplantation: preliminary clinical experience. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Woodle, E.S., Ward, R.E., Stadalnik, R.C., & Vera, D.R. Tc-NGA imaging in liver transplantation: preliminary clinical experience. United States.
Woodle, E.S., Ward, R.E., Stadalnik, R.C., and Vera, D.R. Wed . "Tc-NGA imaging in liver transplantation: preliminary clinical experience". United States.
@article{osti_6173535,
title = {Tc-NGA imaging in liver transplantation: preliminary clinical experience},
author = {Woodle, E.S. and Ward, R.E. and Stadalnik, R.C. and Vera, D.R.},
abstractNote = {Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (Tc-NGA) is a new liver imaging agent that binds to hepatic-binding protein, a hepatocyte-specific membrane receptor. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of Tc-NGA imaging in clinical liver transplantation. A total of 25 studies were performed in nine patients. Imaging studies performed in the early posttransplant period in patients with good hepatic allograft function revealed diffuse patchiness in tracer distribution, a manifestation of preservation damage. Left lobar infarction was demonstrated within a few hours of ischemic injury. Right posterior segmental infarction was seen in another patient. Comparison of kinetic, clinical, and biochemical data revealed good correlation between hepatic allograft function and Tc-NGA kinetics. Major kinetic alterations were noted during periods of preservation injury, hepatic infarction, and acute rejection. These studies indicate: (1) major alterations in Tc-NGA kinetics occur during preservation injury, hepatic infarction, and acute rejection, and (2) Tc-NGA kinetic data appear to provide an accurate reflection of hepatic allograft function. Tc-NGA imaging has the advantages of being noninvasive and of utilizing standard nuclear medicine instrumentation, including portable imaging devices. In conclusion, Tc-NGA imaging provides a promising noninvasive approach for evaluation of liver function in patients undergoing hepatic transplantation.},
doi = {},
journal = {Surgery; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 105:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}