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Title: Cooling energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers in combination with R-11 and R-30 ceiling insulation

Abstract

Oak Ridge National Laboratory continued the testing of radiant barriers in three unoccupied houses near Knoxville, Tennessee, under the joint sponsorship of the Department of Energy and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The prime goal of the work was to determine the effect of the interaction of radiant barriers with different levels of attic insulation on house cooling loads. Both horizontal and truss installations of radiant barriers were used along with R-11 and R-30 fiberglass-batt attic insulation. Previous work had been done at Karns using both types of barriers with R-19. The results of the testing showed that horizontal barriers are more effective than truss barriers. A horizontal radiant barrier in combination with R-11 attic insulation saved 16% compared with R-11 and no barrier. The cooling load reductions with R-30 and a barrier were minimal (2%) compared with R-30 and no barrier. The best performing system was a combination of a horizontal barrier and R-19, which was estimated to reduce the house cooling load by 25.1% when compared with R-11 and no barrier. Differing climates, house styles, configurations and occupancy effects are capable of altering these results.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6171133
Report Number(s):
ORNL/CON-226
ON: DE87012758
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products. Original copy available until stock is exhausted
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; CEILINGS; THERMAL INSULATION; ATTICS; COOLING LOAD; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; HOUSES; ORNL; R FACTORS; TENNESSEE; BUILDINGS; FEDERAL REGION IV; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; NORTH AMERICA; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; US AEC; US DOE; US ERDA; US ORGANIZATIONS; USA; 320107* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Building Systems- (1987-); 320105 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Building Services- (1987-)

Citation Formats

Levins, W P, and Karnitz, M A. Cooling energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers in combination with R-11 and R-30 ceiling insulation. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Levins, W P, & Karnitz, M A. Cooling energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers in combination with R-11 and R-30 ceiling insulation. United States.
Levins, W P, and Karnitz, M A. Fri . "Cooling energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers in combination with R-11 and R-30 ceiling insulation". United States.
@article{osti_6171133,
title = {Cooling energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers in combination with R-11 and R-30 ceiling insulation},
author = {Levins, W P and Karnitz, M A},
abstractNote = {Oak Ridge National Laboratory continued the testing of radiant barriers in three unoccupied houses near Knoxville, Tennessee, under the joint sponsorship of the Department of Energy and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The prime goal of the work was to determine the effect of the interaction of radiant barriers with different levels of attic insulation on house cooling loads. Both horizontal and truss installations of radiant barriers were used along with R-11 and R-30 fiberglass-batt attic insulation. Previous work had been done at Karns using both types of barriers with R-19. The results of the testing showed that horizontal barriers are more effective than truss barriers. A horizontal radiant barrier in combination with R-11 attic insulation saved 16% compared with R-11 and no barrier. The cooling load reductions with R-30 and a barrier were minimal (2%) compared with R-30 and no barrier. The best performing system was a combination of a horizontal barrier and R-19, which was estimated to reduce the house cooling load by 25.1% when compared with R-11 and no barrier. Differing climates, house styles, configurations and occupancy effects are capable of altering these results.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6171133}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1987},
month = {5}
}

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