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Title: Radiation induced fracture of the scapula

Abstract

A case of radiation induced osteonecrosis resulting in a fracture of the scapula in a 76-yr-old female patient with a history of breast carcinoma is presented. Diagnostic imaging, laboratory recommendations and clinical findings are discussed along with an algorithm for the safe management of patients with a history of cancer and musculoskeletal complaints. This case demonstrates the necessity of a thorough investigation of musculoskeletal complaints in patients with previous bone-seeking carcinomas.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, Whittier, CA (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6167961
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics; (USA); Journal Volume: 13:8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; MAMMARY GLANDS; CARCINOMAS; RADIOTHERAPY; SIDE EFFECTS; SKELETAL DISEASES; RADIOINDUCTION; ALGORITHMS; BONE FRACTURES; IMAGE PROCESSING; PATIENTS; RECOMMENDATIONS; BODY; DISEASES; GLANDS; INJURIES; MATHEMATICAL LOGIC; MEDICINE; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ORGANS; PROCESSING; RADIOLOGY; THERAPY; 560151* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Man

Citation Formats

Riggs, J.H. III, Schultz, G.D., and Hanes, S.A.. Radiation induced fracture of the scapula. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Riggs, J.H. III, Schultz, G.D., & Hanes, S.A.. Radiation induced fracture of the scapula. United States.
Riggs, J.H. III, Schultz, G.D., and Hanes, S.A.. 1990. "Radiation induced fracture of the scapula". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6167961,
title = {Radiation induced fracture of the scapula},
author = {Riggs, J.H. III and Schultz, G.D. and Hanes, S.A.},
abstractNote = {A case of radiation induced osteonecrosis resulting in a fracture of the scapula in a 76-yr-old female patient with a history of breast carcinoma is presented. Diagnostic imaging, laboratory recommendations and clinical findings are discussed along with an algorithm for the safe management of patients with a history of cancer and musculoskeletal complaints. This case demonstrates the necessity of a thorough investigation of musculoskeletal complaints in patients with previous bone-seeking carcinomas.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 13:8,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month =
}
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