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Title: Water chemistry and cardiovascular disease risk

Abstract

The evidence linking cardiovascular disease risk and water quality parameters was weighed and analyzed to identify major gaps in understanding reasons for the regional differences in cardiovascular disease mortality in the United States. Epidemiologic studies evaluating occupational and public health exposure to nitrates, carbon monoxide, carbon disulfide, fibrogenic dusts, heavy metals and trace elements, chlorides, and hydro- and fluorocarbons were analyzed. Intake of cholesterol, calcium, and magnesium from food items, cooking water enhancement, and drinking water were also appraised. Based on the current state of knowledge, it is our judgment that the drinking water characteristics of highest priority from the standpoint of cardiovascular disease risks are calcium/magnesium content and chlorine treatment. The potential importance of cadmium, lead, nitrate(s), and chloride/sodium concentrations also needs to be considered. We present working hypotheses to evaluate the role(s) of these parameters and a discussion of variables that should be considered in any study design addressing the association between cardiovascular disease risk and water quality. Important variables are sample size, biological endpoint events (mortality, incidence, clinical determination), population characteristics, drinking water parameters, and dietary intake estimates. 207 references, 6 figures, 17 tables.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6165235
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-9288
ON: DE85006364
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions are illegible in microfiche products. Original copy available until stock is exhausted
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES; RISK ASSESSMENT; WATER QUALITY; HEALTH HAZARDS; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; CARBON MONOXIDE; CARBON SULFIDES; CATIONS; CHLORINE; CORRELATIONS; DRINKING WATER; DUSTS; EPIDEMIOLOGY; HYDROCARBONS; MAGNESIUM COMPOUNDS; METALS; NITRATES; NUTRITION; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; ORGANIC FLUORINE COMPOUNDS; ALKALINE EARTH METAL COMPOUNDS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CHARGED PARTICLES; DISEASES; ELEMENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; HALOGENS; HAZARDS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; IONS; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NONMETALS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SULFIDES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; WATER; 560306* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987); 552000 - Public Health

Citation Formats

Watson, A.P., and Zeighami, E.A. Water chemistry and cardiovascular disease risk. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Watson, A.P., & Zeighami, E.A. Water chemistry and cardiovascular disease risk. United States.
Watson, A.P., and Zeighami, E.A. 1985. "Water chemistry and cardiovascular disease risk". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6165235,
title = {Water chemistry and cardiovascular disease risk},
author = {Watson, A.P. and Zeighami, E.A.},
abstractNote = {The evidence linking cardiovascular disease risk and water quality parameters was weighed and analyzed to identify major gaps in understanding reasons for the regional differences in cardiovascular disease mortality in the United States. Epidemiologic studies evaluating occupational and public health exposure to nitrates, carbon monoxide, carbon disulfide, fibrogenic dusts, heavy metals and trace elements, chlorides, and hydro- and fluorocarbons were analyzed. Intake of cholesterol, calcium, and magnesium from food items, cooking water enhancement, and drinking water were also appraised. Based on the current state of knowledge, it is our judgment that the drinking water characteristics of highest priority from the standpoint of cardiovascular disease risks are calcium/magnesium content and chlorine treatment. The potential importance of cadmium, lead, nitrate(s), and chloride/sodium concentrations also needs to be considered. We present working hypotheses to evaluate the role(s) of these parameters and a discussion of variables that should be considered in any study design addressing the association between cardiovascular disease risk and water quality. Important variables are sample size, biological endpoint events (mortality, incidence, clinical determination), population characteristics, drinking water parameters, and dietary intake estimates. 207 references, 6 figures, 17 tables.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 1
}

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