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Title: Determination of the effect of formation water on fracture-fluid cleanup

Abstract

Understanding hydraulic-fracture cleanup is essential for improving well stimulation. Residual gel damages fracture conductivity, shortens effective fracture half-length, and limits well productivity. The drive to develop fluids, additives, and procedures that minimize this damage continues to be a dominant theme in fracture-fluid-development programs. Fracture cleanup is a complex problem, and many parameters (e.g., fluid system, job design, flowback procedure, and reservoir conditions) can influence polymer and fluid recovery efficiencies. Often, specific products and methods that work well in one reservoir have little effect in another. Systematic analysis of fluid and polymer returns after a treatment is completed is the only way to quantify fracture cleanup. This is referred to as flowback analysis. This paper discusses a flowback-analysis field study on large hydraulic-fracturing treatments in the Taylor zone of the Cotton Valley formation in east Texas. This is a low-permeability (approximately 0.01 md) tight gas formation. It is a heterogeneous zone with layers of productive sandstone interspersed with relatively impermeable layers of shale. A typical well in this field initially produces approximately 0.75 to 1.3 MMcf/D gas and 35 to 40 bbl of water/MMcf of gas. The returns from 10 wells in this field were analyzed thoroughly.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
616291
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
JPT, Journal of Petroleum Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 50; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: Mar 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; HYDRAULIC FRACTURING; FRACTURING FLUIDS; REMOVAL; NATURAL GAS WELLS; HYDRAULIC FRACTURES; HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY; FORMATION DAMAGE; SANDSTONES; WELL STIMULATION; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

. Determination of the effect of formation water on fracture-fluid cleanup. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
. Determination of the effect of formation water on fracture-fluid cleanup. United States.
. 1998. "Determination of the effect of formation water on fracture-fluid cleanup". United States.
@article{osti_616291,
title = {Determination of the effect of formation water on fracture-fluid cleanup},
author = {},
abstractNote = {Understanding hydraulic-fracture cleanup is essential for improving well stimulation. Residual gel damages fracture conductivity, shortens effective fracture half-length, and limits well productivity. The drive to develop fluids, additives, and procedures that minimize this damage continues to be a dominant theme in fracture-fluid-development programs. Fracture cleanup is a complex problem, and many parameters (e.g., fluid system, job design, flowback procedure, and reservoir conditions) can influence polymer and fluid recovery efficiencies. Often, specific products and methods that work well in one reservoir have little effect in another. Systematic analysis of fluid and polymer returns after a treatment is completed is the only way to quantify fracture cleanup. This is referred to as flowback analysis. This paper discusses a flowback-analysis field study on large hydraulic-fracturing treatments in the Taylor zone of the Cotton Valley formation in east Texas. This is a low-permeability (approximately 0.01 md) tight gas formation. It is a heterogeneous zone with layers of productive sandstone interspersed with relatively impermeable layers of shale. A typical well in this field initially produces approximately 0.75 to 1.3 MMcf/D gas and 35 to 40 bbl of water/MMcf of gas. The returns from 10 wells in this field were analyzed thoroughly.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/616291}, journal = {JPT, Journal of Petroleum Technology},
number = 3,
volume = 50,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {3}
}