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Title: CO/sub 2/ removal from ammonia synthesis gas with SELEXOL Solvent Process

Abstract

The high cost of energy which has prevailed since the 70's has forced ammonia producers to seek new methods to save energy and lower the ammonia production cost. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of SELEXOL Solvent Process for treatment of ammonia synthesis gas and discuss a patented SELEXOL process scheme which permits substantially 100% carbon dioxide recovery. This paper also describes: the SELEXOL Process Technology; treating of Ammonia Synthesis Gas; philosophy; high CO/sub 2/ Recovery Process; 100% CO2 Recovery Process; cost and Utility Requirement; plant Performance Data.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6162253
Report Number(s):
CONF-870323-
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: American Institute of Chemical Engineers spring national meeting, Houston, TX, USA, 29 Mar 1987; Other Information: Technical Paper 44C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; AMMONIA; PURIFICATION; SOLVENT EXTRACTION; CARBON DIOXIDE; RECOVERY; ECONOMICS; PROCESSING; PRODUCTION; REMOVAL; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; EXTRACTION; HYDRIDES; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN HYDRIDES; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SEPARATION PROCESSES 090310* -- Inorganic Hydrogen Compound Fuels-- Properties-- (1976-1989)

Citation Formats

Shah, V.A. CO/sub 2/ removal from ammonia synthesis gas with SELEXOL Solvent Process. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Shah, V.A. CO/sub 2/ removal from ammonia synthesis gas with SELEXOL Solvent Process. United States.
Shah, V.A. 1987. "CO/sub 2/ removal from ammonia synthesis gas with SELEXOL Solvent Process". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6162253,
title = {CO/sub 2/ removal from ammonia synthesis gas with SELEXOL Solvent Process},
author = {Shah, V.A.},
abstractNote = {The high cost of energy which has prevailed since the 70's has forced ammonia producers to seek new methods to save energy and lower the ammonia production cost. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of SELEXOL Solvent Process for treatment of ammonia synthesis gas and discuss a patented SELEXOL process scheme which permits substantially 100% carbon dioxide recovery. This paper also describes: the SELEXOL Process Technology; treating of Ammonia Synthesis Gas; philosophy; high CO/sub 2/ Recovery Process; 100% CO2 Recovery Process; cost and Utility Requirement; plant Performance Data.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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