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Title: Distribution of and changes in industrial carbon dioxide production

Abstract

The burning of fossils fuels is believed to be the major source responsible for an observed increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere now measured at many locations around the world. This paper revises earlier published data on the annual amounts of carbon released to the atmosphere during the period 1950--1978 and updates the record through 1980. A latitudinal distribution of the fossil fuel source is presented as an aid in explaining the differences in the observed CO/sub 2/ concentrations at several stations. Data from Mauna Loa Observatory, the South Pole, and elsewhere around the world (Keeling et al., 1978a, b; Bolin and Bischof, 1970; Herbert, 1980) show an increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Attempts to deduce from these records information about the global carbon cycle depend upon data pertaining to the sources of CO/sub 2/ introduced by man: burning of fossil fuels and conversion of the world's forests. The latitudinal distribution of the fossil fuel production of CO/sub 2/ should be an important aid in carbon-cycle analysis. Observations in the atmosphere show that the Northern Hemisphere CO/sub 2/ concentration is increasing more rapidly than the Southern Hemisphere concentration and that themore » most rapid increase is at 50/sup 0/--60/sup 0/N latitude. The greatest seasonal variation also occurs in this latitude band. This paper updates and documents the fossil fuel sources of CO/sub 2/. It revises global CO/sub 2/ emission values for 1950--1978 published earlier; it demonstrates that a change in the rate of increase of annual CO/sub 2/ emissions occurred in 1973; and it attempts to delineate the regional distribution of this source of CO/sub 2/.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Institute of Energy Analysis, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830
OSTI Identifier:
6152366
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
J. Geophys. Res.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 88:C2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON DIOXIDE; EMISSION; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; CARBON CYCLE; CONCENTRATION RATIO; FOSSIL FUELS; LATITUDE EFFECT; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; ENERGY SOURCES; FUELS; GEOGRAPHICAL VARIATIONS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; VARIATIONS; 500200* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Rotty, R M. Distribution of and changes in industrial carbon dioxide production. United States: N. p., 1983. Web. doi:10.1029/JC088iC02p01301.
Rotty, R M. Distribution of and changes in industrial carbon dioxide production. United States. doi:10.1029/JC088iC02p01301.
Rotty, R M. Sun . "Distribution of and changes in industrial carbon dioxide production". United States. doi:10.1029/JC088iC02p01301.
@article{osti_6152366,
title = {Distribution of and changes in industrial carbon dioxide production},
author = {Rotty, R M},
abstractNote = {The burning of fossils fuels is believed to be the major source responsible for an observed increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere now measured at many locations around the world. This paper revises earlier published data on the annual amounts of carbon released to the atmosphere during the period 1950--1978 and updates the record through 1980. A latitudinal distribution of the fossil fuel source is presented as an aid in explaining the differences in the observed CO/sub 2/ concentrations at several stations. Data from Mauna Loa Observatory, the South Pole, and elsewhere around the world (Keeling et al., 1978a, b; Bolin and Bischof, 1970; Herbert, 1980) show an increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Attempts to deduce from these records information about the global carbon cycle depend upon data pertaining to the sources of CO/sub 2/ introduced by man: burning of fossil fuels and conversion of the world's forests. The latitudinal distribution of the fossil fuel production of CO/sub 2/ should be an important aid in carbon-cycle analysis. Observations in the atmosphere show that the Northern Hemisphere CO/sub 2/ concentration is increasing more rapidly than the Southern Hemisphere concentration and that the most rapid increase is at 50/sup 0/--60/sup 0/N latitude. The greatest seasonal variation also occurs in this latitude band. This paper updates and documents the fossil fuel sources of CO/sub 2/. It revises global CO/sub 2/ emission values for 1950--1978 published earlier; it demonstrates that a change in the rate of increase of annual CO/sub 2/ emissions occurred in 1973; and it attempts to delineate the regional distribution of this source of CO/sub 2/.},
doi = {10.1029/JC088iC02p01301},
journal = {J. Geophys. Res.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 88:C2,
place = {United States},
year = {1983},
month = {2}
}