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Title: Detection of multiple, novel reverse transcriptase coding sequences in human nucleic acids: relation to primate retroviruses

Abstract

A variety of chemically synthesized oligonucleotides designed on the basis of amino acid and/or nucleotide sequence data were used to detect a large number of novel reverse transcriptase coding sequences in human and mouse DNAs. Procedures involving Southern blotting, library screening, and the polymerase chain reaction were all used to detect such sequences; the polymerase chain reaction was the most rapid and productive approach. In the polymerase chain reaction, oligonucleotide mixtures based on consensus sequence homologies to reverse transcriptase coding sequences and unique oligonucleotides containing perfect homology to the coding sequences of human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II were both effective in amplifying reverse transcriptase-related DNA. It is shown that human DNA contains a wide spectrum of retrovirus-related reverse transcriptase coding sequences, including some that are clearly related to human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II, some that are related to the L-1 family of long interspersed nucleotide sequences, and others that are related to previously described human endogenous proviral DNAs. In addition, human T-cell leukemia virus type I-related sequences appear to be transcribed in both normal human T cells and in a cell line derived from a human teratocarcinoma.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
New York Univ. School of Medicine, NY (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6143994
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6143994
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Virol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 63:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; DNA POLYMERASES; AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; OLIGONUCLEOTIDES; HYBRIDIZATION; VIRUSES; DNA SEQUENCING; CARCINOMAS; LEUKEMIA VIRUSES; MAN; MICE; PHOSPHORUS 32; ANIMALS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DISEASES; ENZYMES; ISOTOPES; LIGHT NUCLEI; MAMMALS; MICROORGANISMS; MOLECULAR STRUCTURE; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEI; NUCLEIC ACIDS; NUCLEOTIDYLTRANSFERASES; ODD-ODD NUCLEI; ONCOGENIC VIRUSES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PARASITES; PHOSPHORUS ISOTOPES; PHOSPHORUS-GROUP TRANSFERASES; POLYMERASES; PRIMATES; RADIOISOTOPES; RODENTS; STRUCTURAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; TRANSFERASES; VERTEBRATES 550201* -- Biochemistry-- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Shih, A., Misra, R., and Rush, M.G. Detection of multiple, novel reverse transcriptase coding sequences in human nucleic acids: relation to primate retroviruses. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Shih, A., Misra, R., & Rush, M.G. Detection of multiple, novel reverse transcriptase coding sequences in human nucleic acids: relation to primate retroviruses. United States.
Shih, A., Misra, R., and Rush, M.G. Sun . "Detection of multiple, novel reverse transcriptase coding sequences in human nucleic acids: relation to primate retroviruses". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6143994,
title = {Detection of multiple, novel reverse transcriptase coding sequences in human nucleic acids: relation to primate retroviruses},
author = {Shih, A. and Misra, R. and Rush, M.G.},
abstractNote = {A variety of chemically synthesized oligonucleotides designed on the basis of amino acid and/or nucleotide sequence data were used to detect a large number of novel reverse transcriptase coding sequences in human and mouse DNAs. Procedures involving Southern blotting, library screening, and the polymerase chain reaction were all used to detect such sequences; the polymerase chain reaction was the most rapid and productive approach. In the polymerase chain reaction, oligonucleotide mixtures based on consensus sequence homologies to reverse transcriptase coding sequences and unique oligonucleotides containing perfect homology to the coding sequences of human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II were both effective in amplifying reverse transcriptase-related DNA. It is shown that human DNA contains a wide spectrum of retrovirus-related reverse transcriptase coding sequences, including some that are clearly related to human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II, some that are related to the L-1 family of long interspersed nucleotide sequences, and others that are related to previously described human endogenous proviral DNAs. In addition, human T-cell leukemia virus type I-related sequences appear to be transcribed in both normal human T cells and in a cell line derived from a human teratocarcinoma.},
doi = {},
journal = {J. Virol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 63:1,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}
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