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Title: Extensional duplex in the Purcell Mountains of southeastern British Columbia

Abstract

An extensional duplex consisting of fault-bounded blocks (horses) located between how-angle normal faults is exposed in Proterozoic strata in the Purcell Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. This is one of the first documented extensional duplexes, and it is geometrically and kinematically analogous to duplexes developed in contractional and strike-slip fault systems. The duplex formed within an extensional fault with a ramp and flat geometry when horses were sliced from the ramp and transported within the fault system.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Shell Canada Limited, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6140566
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geology; (USA); Journal Volume: 18:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; BRITISH COLUMBIA; MOUNTAINS; GEOMORPHOLOGY; AGE ESTIMATION; DEFORMATION; GEOLOGIC FAULTS; GEOLOGIC FORMATIONS; GEOLOGIC HISTORY; GEOMETRY; PRECAMBRIAN ERA; TECTONICS; CANADA; GEOLOGIC AGES; GEOLOGIC FRACTURES; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; GEOLOGY; MATHEMATICS; NORTH AMERICA; 580000* - Geosciences

Citation Formats

Root, K.G.. Extensional duplex in the Purcell Mountains of southeastern British Columbia. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1130/0091-7613(1990)018<0419:EDITPM>2.3.CO;2.
Root, K.G.. Extensional duplex in the Purcell Mountains of southeastern British Columbia. United States. doi:10.1130/0091-7613(1990)018<0419:EDITPM>2.3.CO;2.
Root, K.G.. 1990. "Extensional duplex in the Purcell Mountains of southeastern British Columbia". United States. doi:10.1130/0091-7613(1990)018<0419:EDITPM>2.3.CO;2.
@article{osti_6140566,
title = {Extensional duplex in the Purcell Mountains of southeastern British Columbia},
author = {Root, K.G.},
abstractNote = {An extensional duplex consisting of fault-bounded blocks (horses) located between how-angle normal faults is exposed in Proterozoic strata in the Purcell Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. This is one of the first documented extensional duplexes, and it is geometrically and kinematically analogous to duplexes developed in contractional and strike-slip fault systems. The duplex formed within an extensional fault with a ramp and flat geometry when horses were sliced from the ramp and transported within the fault system.},
doi = {10.1130/0091-7613(1990)018<0419:EDITPM>2.3.CO;2},
journal = {Geology; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 18:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 5
}
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