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Title: Heat pump centered integrated community energy systems. System development, Franklin Research Center interim report

Abstract

The concept of a heat pump centered integrated community energy system (HP-ICES) was explored based on a reference community located in the Northeast with a population of 10,000. Engineering and economic analyses were performed for the HP-ICES and for conventional heating/cooling systems. Sensitivity analyses were used to determine variations in results from changes in: community size; community energy density; waste heat utilization; energy cost escalation; maintenance and operating personnel; and central HP-ICES ownership. The effect of each of the critical parameters on the economic viability of HP-ICES is shown. Conditions of equal 20-year life cycle costs for HP-ICES and for conventional systems are given. If little or no waste heat is available from nearby industrial installations, high community energy density rates (corresponding to urban conditions) are required for economic viability of HP-ICES. If large amounts of waste heat are available, even relatively loosely built-up communities look promising provided the system is owned by the municipality. If the system is owned and operated by a shareholder-owned public utility, either the community energy density must be high, or large quantities of waste heat must be available, or electricity and oil costs must escalate rapidly during the life of the system to assuremore » economic competitiveness with conventional systems. All HP-ICES use significantly less resource energy than conventional systems. For the baseline system analyzed, HP-ICES use 26% to 40% less resource energy than conventional systems during the heating season and 19% less energy during the peak cooling period. The annual resource energy saving for the HP-ICES is 22% to 34%. It is estimated that the HP-ICES concept is applicable to an average of 500 new communities to be constructed during the 1985--2000 period. The probable resource energy saving during that time period is 1.25 x 10/sup 15/ Btu.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
6140100
Report Number(s):
ANL/ICES-TM-26
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31-109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; DISTRICT COOLING; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; DISTRICT HEATING; WASTE HEAT UTILIZATION; HEAT PUMPS; SPECIFICATIONS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; ICES; ENERGY CONSERVATION; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; GRAPHS; NUMERICAL DATA; TABLES; COOLING; DATA; DATA FORMS; ECONOMICS; HEAT EXCHANGERS; HEATING; INFORMATION; WASTE PRODUCT UTILIZATION; 320600* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Municipalities & Community Systems- (1980-); 290800 - Energy Planning & Policy- Heat Utilization- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Crane, R E, Lorsch, H G, and Werden, R G. Heat pump centered integrated community energy systems. System development, Franklin Research Center interim report. United States: N. p., 1979. Web. doi:10.2172/6140100.
Crane, R E, Lorsch, H G, & Werden, R G. Heat pump centered integrated community energy systems. System development, Franklin Research Center interim report. United States. doi:10.2172/6140100.
Crane, R E, Lorsch, H G, and Werden, R G. Thu . "Heat pump centered integrated community energy systems. System development, Franklin Research Center interim report". United States. doi:10.2172/6140100. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6140100.
@article{osti_6140100,
title = {Heat pump centered integrated community energy systems. System development, Franklin Research Center interim report},
author = {Crane, R E and Lorsch, H G and Werden, R G},
abstractNote = {The concept of a heat pump centered integrated community energy system (HP-ICES) was explored based on a reference community located in the Northeast with a population of 10,000. Engineering and economic analyses were performed for the HP-ICES and for conventional heating/cooling systems. Sensitivity analyses were used to determine variations in results from changes in: community size; community energy density; waste heat utilization; energy cost escalation; maintenance and operating personnel; and central HP-ICES ownership. The effect of each of the critical parameters on the economic viability of HP-ICES is shown. Conditions of equal 20-year life cycle costs for HP-ICES and for conventional systems are given. If little or no waste heat is available from nearby industrial installations, high community energy density rates (corresponding to urban conditions) are required for economic viability of HP-ICES. If large amounts of waste heat are available, even relatively loosely built-up communities look promising provided the system is owned by the municipality. If the system is owned and operated by a shareholder-owned public utility, either the community energy density must be high, or large quantities of waste heat must be available, or electricity and oil costs must escalate rapidly during the life of the system to assure economic competitiveness with conventional systems. All HP-ICES use significantly less resource energy than conventional systems. For the baseline system analyzed, HP-ICES use 26% to 40% less resource energy than conventional systems during the heating season and 19% less energy during the peak cooling period. The annual resource energy saving for the HP-ICES is 22% to 34%. It is estimated that the HP-ICES concept is applicable to an average of 500 new communities to be constructed during the 1985--2000 period. The probable resource energy saving during that time period is 1.25 x 10/sup 15/ Btu.},
doi = {10.2172/6140100},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {2}
}