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Title: Primary production and canopy cover in bitterbrush-cheatgrass communities

Abstract

Aboveground grass and forb production averaged 126 g m/sup -2/ yr/sup -1/ and ranged between 10 and 195 grams over a four year period 1975-1978. The low production year was 1977, a year of extreme drought. Production was not significantly different between unburned sites and burned sites five years post burning (1970). Canopy cover and species composition were similar on burned and unburned sites except for the shrubs, bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata) and sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), which were killed by burning. There was no indication that shrubs were invading the burned areas as seedlings or vegetatively through sprouting. The implications of burning and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) management are briefly discussed.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA
OSTI Identifier:
6138747
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Northwest Sci.; (United States); Journal Volume: 56:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GRASS; SAMPLING; SHRUBS; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS; PRODUCTIVITY; SPECIES DIVERSITY; ARID LANDS; DEER; FIRES; WASHINGTON; ANIMALS; ECOSYSTEMS; FEDERAL REGION X; MAMMALS; NORTH AMERICA; PLANTS; RUMINANTS; USA; VERTEBRATES; 510100* - Environment, Terrestrial- Basic Studies- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Rickard, W.H., and Sauer, R.H. Primary production and canopy cover in bitterbrush-cheatgrass communities. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Rickard, W.H., & Sauer, R.H. Primary production and canopy cover in bitterbrush-cheatgrass communities. United States.
Rickard, W.H., and Sauer, R.H. Fri . "Primary production and canopy cover in bitterbrush-cheatgrass communities". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6138747,
title = {Primary production and canopy cover in bitterbrush-cheatgrass communities},
author = {Rickard, W.H. and Sauer, R.H.},
abstractNote = {Aboveground grass and forb production averaged 126 g m/sup -2/ yr/sup -1/ and ranged between 10 and 195 grams over a four year period 1975-1978. The low production year was 1977, a year of extreme drought. Production was not significantly different between unburned sites and burned sites five years post burning (1970). Canopy cover and species composition were similar on burned and unburned sites except for the shrubs, bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata) and sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), which were killed by burning. There was no indication that shrubs were invading the burned areas as seedlings or vegetatively through sprouting. The implications of burning and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) management are briefly discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {Northwest Sci.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 56:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1982},
month = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1982}
}
  • Steep north- and south-facing slopes on an artificially formed earth mound were seeded with cheatgrass in the autumn of 1971 and left unattended. In 1978, canopy cover and phytomass measurements were made on both slopes. The vegetative cover on the north-facing slope provided more canopy cover and more live phytomass than the south-facing slope. Live aboveground phytomass was measured at 830 g/m/sup 2/ on the north-facing slope and 163 g/m/sup 2/ on the south-facing slope. The large amount of primary production on the north-facing slope is attributed to temperature-water relationships rather than to soil nutrient differences because the mound wasmore » composed of the same homogeneous mix of soil of common origin.« less
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