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Title: The validation of field-portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the analysis of metals in marine sediments

Abstract

The primary focus of this study has been the determination of FPXRF detection limits of metals, specifically Cu, Zn and Pb, in marine sediments in the field, and the demonstration of the capabilities of the portable instrument relative to detailed standard chemical analyses. Instrument detection limits have been determined, and these have been compared to the manufacturer-stated detection limits. The lower linear range of the instrument was examined for Cu, Zn and Pb using serial dilutions of a standard reference material, PACS-1 marine sediment (NRCC, Ottawa, Canada). Results from FPXRF analyses of sediment samples from various locations have been compared with results from standard analyses (ICP, AAS, Laboratory XRF). The data are used to draw correlations between the different methods, as well as to aid in establishing detection limits. The ability to reliably detect metals in sediments would allow for the generation of data from sediment grabs in a time-frame that could guide on site decision making for mapping strategies and detailed sampling.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. NCCOSC, San Diego, CA (United States)
  2. San Diego State Foundation, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
613807
Report Number(s):
CONF-970113-
TRN: 98:001739-0057
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Field analytical methods for hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals conference, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 29-31 Jan 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Field analytical methods for hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals; PB: 909 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; DETECTION; MAPPING; METALS; SAMPLING; SEDIMENTS; X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS; COPPER; ZINC; LEAD

Citation Formats

Kirtay, V.J., Apitz, S.E., and Kellum, J.H. The validation of field-portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the analysis of metals in marine sediments. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Kirtay, V.J., Apitz, S.E., & Kellum, J.H. The validation of field-portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the analysis of metals in marine sediments. United States.
Kirtay, V.J., Apitz, S.E., and Kellum, J.H. Wed . "The validation of field-portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the analysis of metals in marine sediments". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_613807,
title = {The validation of field-portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the analysis of metals in marine sediments},
author = {Kirtay, V.J. and Apitz, S.E. and Kellum, J.H.},
abstractNote = {The primary focus of this study has been the determination of FPXRF detection limits of metals, specifically Cu, Zn and Pb, in marine sediments in the field, and the demonstration of the capabilities of the portable instrument relative to detailed standard chemical analyses. Instrument detection limits have been determined, and these have been compared to the manufacturer-stated detection limits. The lower linear range of the instrument was examined for Cu, Zn and Pb using serial dilutions of a standard reference material, PACS-1 marine sediment (NRCC, Ottawa, Canada). Results from FPXRF analyses of sediment samples from various locations have been compared with results from standard analyses (ICP, AAS, Laboratory XRF). The data are used to draw correlations between the different methods, as well as to aid in establishing detection limits. The ability to reliably detect metals in sediments would allow for the generation of data from sediment grabs in a time-frame that could guide on site decision making for mapping strategies and detailed sampling.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1997},
month = {Wed Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1997}
}

Conference:
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