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Title: Severe accidents in spent fuel pools in support of generic safety, Issue 82

Abstract

This investigation provides an assessment of the likelihood and consequences of a severe accident in a spent fuel storage pool - the complete draining of the pool. Potential mechanisms and conditions for failure of the spent fuel, and the subsequent release of the fission products, are identified. Two older PWR and BWR spent fuel storage pool designs are considered based on a preliminary screening study which tried to identify vulnerabilities. Internal and external events and accidents are assessed. Conditions which could lead to failure of the spent fuel Zircaloy cladding as a result of cladding rupture or as a result of a self-sustaining oxidation reaction are presented. Propagation of a cladding fire to older stored fuel assemblies is evaluated. Spent fuel pool fission product inventory is estimated and the releases and consequences for the various cladding scenarios are provided. Possible preventive or mitigative measures are qualitatively evaluated. The uncertainties in the risk estimate are large, and areas where additional evaluations are needed to reduce uncertainty are identified.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Div. of Reactor and Plant Systems
OSTI Identifier:
6135335
Report Number(s):
NUREG/CR-4982; BNL-NUREG-52093
ON: TI87013442
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76CH00016
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; BWR TYPE REACTORS; SPENT FUEL STORAGE; PWR TYPE REACTORS; FUEL POOLS; STORAGE FACILITIES; ACCIDENTS; FAILURES; FISSION PRODUCTS; FUEL CANS; SAFETY; SPENT FUEL ELEMENTS; ZIRCALOY; ALLOYS; FUEL ELEMENTS; ISOTOPES; MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; REACTOR COMPONENTS; REACTORS; STORAGE; TIN ALLOYS; WATER COOLED REACTORS; WATER MODERATED REACTORS; ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS; ZIRCONIUM BASE ALLOYS; 050900* - Nuclear Fuels- Transport, Handling, & Storage; 220900 - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Reactor Safety; 210100 - Power Reactors, Nonbreeding, Light-Water Moderated, Boiling Water Cooled; 210200 - Power Reactors, Nonbreeding, Light-Water Moderated, Nonboiling Water Cooled

Citation Formats

Sailor, V.L., Perkins, K.R., Weeks, J.R., and Connell, H.R. Severe accidents in spent fuel pools in support of generic safety, Issue 82. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.2172/6135335.
Sailor, V.L., Perkins, K.R., Weeks, J.R., & Connell, H.R. Severe accidents in spent fuel pools in support of generic safety, Issue 82. United States. doi:10.2172/6135335.
Sailor, V.L., Perkins, K.R., Weeks, J.R., and Connell, H.R. 1987. "Severe accidents in spent fuel pools in support of generic safety, Issue 82". United States. doi:10.2172/6135335. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6135335.
@article{osti_6135335,
title = {Severe accidents in spent fuel pools in support of generic safety, Issue 82},
author = {Sailor, V.L. and Perkins, K.R. and Weeks, J.R. and Connell, H.R.},
abstractNote = {This investigation provides an assessment of the likelihood and consequences of a severe accident in a spent fuel storage pool - the complete draining of the pool. Potential mechanisms and conditions for failure of the spent fuel, and the subsequent release of the fission products, are identified. Two older PWR and BWR spent fuel storage pool designs are considered based on a preliminary screening study which tried to identify vulnerabilities. Internal and external events and accidents are assessed. Conditions which could lead to failure of the spent fuel Zircaloy cladding as a result of cladding rupture or as a result of a self-sustaining oxidation reaction are presented. Propagation of a cladding fire to older stored fuel assemblies is evaluated. Spent fuel pool fission product inventory is estimated and the releases and consequences for the various cladding scenarios are provided. Possible preventive or mitigative measures are qualitatively evaluated. The uncertainties in the risk estimate are large, and areas where additional evaluations are needed to reduce uncertainty are identified.},
doi = {10.2172/6135335},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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