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Title: Correlation of reservoired gases using the carbon isotopic compositions of wet gas components

Abstract

The carbon isotopic compositions of the wet gas components, particularly propane, isobutane, and normal butane, have been found to be particularly valuable for correlating one reservoired gas with another. The usefulness of these components for correlation results from their carbon isotopic compositions reflecting both the nature of their source and their maturity. This source control is strongest for gases derived from the more highly structured types of kerogen (i.e., woody-coaly; type III), although the wet gas components carbon isotopic compositions of most gases are at least partly controlled by their source for levels of maturity below the point at which thermal destruction of the wet components occurs. As a result, the wet gas components are found to provide more positive correlations than is methane alone. Three exploration examples illustrate the use of the carbon isotopic compositions of the wet gas components for correlation: the Leduc reef trend of Alberta, Canada; the Sleipner area in the North Sea; and the Lena field, offshore Louisiana, US. The three examples also illustrate the need to integrate geochemical interpretations with regional geology to obtain a good understanding of the hydrocarbon source. 16 figs., 6 tabs.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6126591
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6126591
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
AAPG Bulletin (American Association of Petroleum Geologists); (USA)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 74:9; Journal ID: ISSN 0149-1423
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 58 GEOSCIENCES; NATURAL GAS; CARBON ISOTOPES; NATURAL GAS DEPOSITS; CORRELATIONS; EXPLORATION; ORIGIN; SOURCE ROCKS; ALBERTA; BUTANE; GEOCHEMISTRY; ISOTOPE RATIO; LOUISIANA; METHANE; OFFSHORE SITES; PROPANE; REEFS; RESERVOIR ROCK; ALKANES; CANADA; CHEMISTRY; ENERGY SOURCES; FEDERAL REGION VI; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; HYDROCARBONS; ISOTOPES; MINERAL RESOURCES; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; RESOURCES; USA 030200* -- Natural Gas-- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration; 580000 -- Geosciences

Citation Formats

James, A.T. Correlation of reservoired gases using the carbon isotopic compositions of wet gas components. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
James, A.T. Correlation of reservoired gases using the carbon isotopic compositions of wet gas components. United States.
James, A.T. Sat . "Correlation of reservoired gases using the carbon isotopic compositions of wet gas components". United States.
@article{osti_6126591,
title = {Correlation of reservoired gases using the carbon isotopic compositions of wet gas components},
author = {James, A.T.},
abstractNote = {The carbon isotopic compositions of the wet gas components, particularly propane, isobutane, and normal butane, have been found to be particularly valuable for correlating one reservoired gas with another. The usefulness of these components for correlation results from their carbon isotopic compositions reflecting both the nature of their source and their maturity. This source control is strongest for gases derived from the more highly structured types of kerogen (i.e., woody-coaly; type III), although the wet gas components carbon isotopic compositions of most gases are at least partly controlled by their source for levels of maturity below the point at which thermal destruction of the wet components occurs. As a result, the wet gas components are found to provide more positive correlations than is methane alone. Three exploration examples illustrate the use of the carbon isotopic compositions of the wet gas components for correlation: the Leduc reef trend of Alberta, Canada; the Sleipner area in the North Sea; and the Lena field, offshore Louisiana, US. The three examples also illustrate the need to integrate geochemical interpretations with regional geology to obtain a good understanding of the hydrocarbon source. 16 figs., 6 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {AAPG Bulletin (American Association of Petroleum Geologists); (USA)},
issn = {0149-1423},
number = ,
volume = 74:9,
place = {United States},
year = {1990},
month = {9}
}