skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Judith River Formation beneath Fort Peck Indian Reservation - proven high plains gas frontier in northeastern Montana

Abstract

As one of the progradational sequences in the Late Cretaceous, the Claggett-Judith River cycle created potential reservoirs for shallow biogenic gas. From west to east across the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana, in a distance of 75 mi (121 km), the Judith River Formation changes from a 350-ft (107-m) accumulation of fine-grained nonmarine clastics, to a 130-ft (39-m) deposit of fine-grained sandstone. Three units are present in the subsurface of the central part of the reservation. A continuous basal sandstone, 30-130 ft (9-39 m) thick, formed in a coastal environment. This unit thickens in the direction of progradation, which may indicate the addition of sand bodies in a shelf environment. The middle unit is a 20 to 50-ft (6 to 15-m) sequence of shale and siltstone. Capping the Judith River is a sandstone 20-50 ft (6-15 m) thick, which formed either as a shore facies in the regressive cycle or as a shelf sandstone prior to the final Cretaceous transgression that deposited the overlying Bearpaw Shale. Stratigraphic traps exist in the upper and lower sandstone units due to variation in grain size and clay content associated with the progradational facies changes. In addition, Laramide structures associated with the Poplarmore » dome and Wolf Creek nose have created local trapping mechanisms. Judith River gas has been produced for operational use since 1952 in the East Poplar field. Shows have been reported in central reservation wells, although high mud weights and deeper exploration targets have prevented adequate evaluation of the Judith River gas frontier.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fort Peck Tribes, Poplar, MT (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6123477
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6123477
Report Number(s):
CONF-8808223-
Journal ID: CODEN: AABUD
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
AAPG (Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol.) Bull.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 72:7; Conference: AAPG Rocky Mountain Section meeting, Bismarck, ND, USA, 21 Aug 1988
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; MONTANA; NATURAL GAS DEPOSITS; EXPLORATION; CRETACEOUS PERIOD; GEOLOGIC FORMATIONS; GEOLOGIC TRAPS; SANDSTONES; SHALES; FEDERAL REGION VIII; GEOLOGIC AGES; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; MESOZOIC ERA; MINERAL RESOURCES; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; ROCKS; SEDIMENTARY ROCKS; USA 030200* -- Natural Gas-- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration

Citation Formats

Monson, L.M. Judith River Formation beneath Fort Peck Indian Reservation - proven high plains gas frontier in northeastern Montana. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Monson, L.M. Judith River Formation beneath Fort Peck Indian Reservation - proven high plains gas frontier in northeastern Montana. United States.
Monson, L.M. Fri . "Judith River Formation beneath Fort Peck Indian Reservation - proven high plains gas frontier in northeastern Montana". United States.
@article{osti_6123477,
title = {Judith River Formation beneath Fort Peck Indian Reservation - proven high plains gas frontier in northeastern Montana},
author = {Monson, L.M.},
abstractNote = {As one of the progradational sequences in the Late Cretaceous, the Claggett-Judith River cycle created potential reservoirs for shallow biogenic gas. From west to east across the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana, in a distance of 75 mi (121 km), the Judith River Formation changes from a 350-ft (107-m) accumulation of fine-grained nonmarine clastics, to a 130-ft (39-m) deposit of fine-grained sandstone. Three units are present in the subsurface of the central part of the reservation. A continuous basal sandstone, 30-130 ft (9-39 m) thick, formed in a coastal environment. This unit thickens in the direction of progradation, which may indicate the addition of sand bodies in a shelf environment. The middle unit is a 20 to 50-ft (6 to 15-m) sequence of shale and siltstone. Capping the Judith River is a sandstone 20-50 ft (6-15 m) thick, which formed either as a shore facies in the regressive cycle or as a shelf sandstone prior to the final Cretaceous transgression that deposited the overlying Bearpaw Shale. Stratigraphic traps exist in the upper and lower sandstone units due to variation in grain size and clay content associated with the progradational facies changes. In addition, Laramide structures associated with the Poplar dome and Wolf Creek nose have created local trapping mechanisms. Judith River gas has been produced for operational use since 1952 in the East Poplar field. Shows have been reported in central reservation wells, although high mud weights and deeper exploration targets have prevented adequate evaluation of the Judith River gas frontier.},
doi = {},
journal = {AAPG (Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol.) Bull.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 72:7,
place = {United States},
year = {1988},
month = {7}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: