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Title: Inhibition of seagrass photosynthesis by ultraviolet-B radiation

Abstract

Effects of ultraviolet-B radiation on the photosynthesis of seagrasses (Halophila engelmanni Aschers, Halodule wrightii Aschers, and Syringodium filiforme (Kuetz) were examined. The intrinsic tolerance of each seagrass to ultraviolet-B, the presence and effectiveness of photorepair mechanisms to ultraviolet-B-induced photosynthetic inhibition, and the role of epiphytic growth as a shield from ultraviolet-B were investigated. Halodule was found to possess the greatest photosynthetic tolerance for ultraviolet-B. Photosynthesis in Syringodium was slightly more sensitive to ultraviolet-B while Halophila showed relatively little photosynthetic tolerance. Evidence for a photorepair mechanism was found only in Halodule. Syringodium appeared to rely primarily on a thick epidermal cell layer to reduce photosynthetic damage. Halophila seemed to have no morphological or photorepair capabilities to deal with ultraviolet-B. This species appeared to rely on epiphytic and detrital shielding and the shade provided by other seagrasses to reduce ultraviolet-B irradiation to tolerable levels. The presence of epiphytes on leaf surfaces was found to reduce the extent of photosynthetic inhibition from ultraviolet-B exposure in all species. Halophila appears to obtain an increased photosynthetic tolerance to ultraviolet-B as an indirect benefit of chloroplast clumping to avoid photo-oxidation by intense levels of photosynthetically active radiation.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Florida Inst., of Tech., Melbourne
OSTI Identifier:
6120647
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Plant Physiol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 68:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GRASS; RADIOSENSITIVITY; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; BIOLOGICAL REPAIR; CHRONIC IRRADIATION; COASTAL REGIONS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; INHIBITION; LEAVES; NEAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL RECOVERY; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHRONIC EXPOSURE; ECOSYSTEMS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; IRRADIATION; PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS; PLANTS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; RECOVERY; REPAIR; SYNTHESIS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; 560141* - Radiation Effects on Plants- Basic Studies- (-1987); 560113 - Radiation Effects on Biochemicals- In Plants- (-1987); 500200 - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Trocine, R.P., Rice, J.D., and Wells, G.N.. Inhibition of seagrass photosynthesis by ultraviolet-B radiation. United States: N. p., 1981. Web. doi:10.1104/pp.68.1.74.
Trocine, R.P., Rice, J.D., & Wells, G.N.. Inhibition of seagrass photosynthesis by ultraviolet-B radiation. United States. doi:10.1104/pp.68.1.74.
Trocine, R.P., Rice, J.D., and Wells, G.N.. Wed . "Inhibition of seagrass photosynthesis by ultraviolet-B radiation". United States. doi:10.1104/pp.68.1.74.
@article{osti_6120647,
title = {Inhibition of seagrass photosynthesis by ultraviolet-B radiation},
author = {Trocine, R.P. and Rice, J.D. and Wells, G.N.},
abstractNote = {Effects of ultraviolet-B radiation on the photosynthesis of seagrasses (Halophila engelmanni Aschers, Halodule wrightii Aschers, and Syringodium filiforme (Kuetz) were examined. The intrinsic tolerance of each seagrass to ultraviolet-B, the presence and effectiveness of photorepair mechanisms to ultraviolet-B-induced photosynthetic inhibition, and the role of epiphytic growth as a shield from ultraviolet-B were investigated. Halodule was found to possess the greatest photosynthetic tolerance for ultraviolet-B. Photosynthesis in Syringodium was slightly more sensitive to ultraviolet-B while Halophila showed relatively little photosynthetic tolerance. Evidence for a photorepair mechanism was found only in Halodule. Syringodium appeared to rely primarily on a thick epidermal cell layer to reduce photosynthetic damage. Halophila seemed to have no morphological or photorepair capabilities to deal with ultraviolet-B. This species appeared to rely on epiphytic and detrital shielding and the shade provided by other seagrasses to reduce ultraviolet-B irradiation to tolerable levels. The presence of epiphytes on leaf surfaces was found to reduce the extent of photosynthetic inhibition from ultraviolet-B exposure in all species. Halophila appears to obtain an increased photosynthetic tolerance to ultraviolet-B as an indirect benefit of chloroplast clumping to avoid photo-oxidation by intense levels of photosynthetically active radiation.},
doi = {10.1104/pp.68.1.74},
journal = {Plant Physiol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 68:1,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1981},
month = {Wed Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1981}
}