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Title: Surfactant-induced hydrogen production in cyanobacteria

Abstract

Addition of Tween 85 to aqueous suspensions of Anabaena variabilis induced photosynthetic evolution of hydrogen over a time span of several weeks: as much as 148 nmol H[sub 2]/h [center dot] mg dry weight was produced in the first week by a suspension containing 4.2 mg dry weight of cells and 77 mM Tween 85. The chemical structure of Tween 85 was a necessary prerequisite for inducing hydrogen production, as compounds such as Tween 20, 60, and 80 had a quite different effect. There was a coupling between photosynthetic oxygen evolution and hydrogen evolution: Hydrogen evolution started to be effective only when oxygen evolution subdued. The presence of heterocysts in A. variabilis was also required for the Tween-induced hydrogen production. Based on these observations, possible mechanisms for the photosynthetic effect of Tween 85 are advanced and discussed.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. (Inst. fuer Polymere, Zuerich (Switzerland))
  2. (Univ. di Bologna (Italy). Dept. di Biologia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6118802
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biotechnology and Bioengineering; (United States); Journal Volume: 42:8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; CYANOBACTERIA; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION; BIOSYNTHESIS; SURFACTANTS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; MICROORGANISMS; PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS; SYNTHESIS; 080106* - Hydrogen- Production- Biosynthesis & Photochemical Processes

Citation Formats

Famiglietti, M., Luisi, P.L., and Hochkoeppler, A.. Surfactant-induced hydrogen production in cyanobacteria. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.1002/bit.260420812.
Famiglietti, M., Luisi, P.L., & Hochkoeppler, A.. Surfactant-induced hydrogen production in cyanobacteria. United States. doi:10.1002/bit.260420812.
Famiglietti, M., Luisi, P.L., and Hochkoeppler, A.. 1993. "Surfactant-induced hydrogen production in cyanobacteria". United States. doi:10.1002/bit.260420812.
@article{osti_6118802,
title = {Surfactant-induced hydrogen production in cyanobacteria},
author = {Famiglietti, M. and Luisi, P.L. and Hochkoeppler, A.},
abstractNote = {Addition of Tween 85 to aqueous suspensions of Anabaena variabilis induced photosynthetic evolution of hydrogen over a time span of several weeks: as much as 148 nmol H[sub 2]/h [center dot] mg dry weight was produced in the first week by a suspension containing 4.2 mg dry weight of cells and 77 mM Tween 85. The chemical structure of Tween 85 was a necessary prerequisite for inducing hydrogen production, as compounds such as Tween 20, 60, and 80 had a quite different effect. There was a coupling between photosynthetic oxygen evolution and hydrogen evolution: Hydrogen evolution started to be effective only when oxygen evolution subdued. The presence of heterocysts in A. variabilis was also required for the Tween-induced hydrogen production. Based on these observations, possible mechanisms for the photosynthetic effect of Tween 85 are advanced and discussed.},
doi = {10.1002/bit.260420812},
journal = {Biotechnology and Bioengineering; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 42:8,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month =
}
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