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Title: Valuation of ecological resources

Abstract

Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providingmore » the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
61125
Report Number(s):
PNL-10533
ON: DE95011335; TRN: AHC29516%%60
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Apr 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; WASHINGTON; ECOLOGY; RESOURCES; EVALUATION; ECONOMIC IMPACT; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; COMPILED DATA

Citation Formats

Scott, M J, Bilyard, G R, Link, S O, Ricci, P F, Seely, H E, Ulibarri, C A, and Westerdahl, H E. Valuation of ecological resources. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/61125.
Scott, M J, Bilyard, G R, Link, S O, Ricci, P F, Seely, H E, Ulibarri, C A, & Westerdahl, H E. Valuation of ecological resources. United States. doi:10.2172/61125.
Scott, M J, Bilyard, G R, Link, S O, Ricci, P F, Seely, H E, Ulibarri, C A, and Westerdahl, H E. Sat . "Valuation of ecological resources". United States. doi:10.2172/61125. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/61125.
@article{osti_61125,
title = {Valuation of ecological resources},
author = {Scott, M J and Bilyard, G R and Link, S O and Ricci, P F and Seely, H E and Ulibarri, C A and Westerdahl, H E},
abstractNote = {Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providing the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.},
doi = {10.2172/61125},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {4}
}