skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Effects of solar ultraviolet photons on mammalian cell DNA. [UVA (320-400 nm):a2]

Abstract

This document presents information on the possible mechanisms of carcinogenesis caused by UVA (ultraviolet radiation in the 320--400 nm region). Most studies showing the carcinogenic effects of ultraviolet light have concentrated on UVB (280--320 nm). UVA had been considered harmless even though it penetrates biological tissues better than UVB. Recently, it has become apparent that UVA is also capable of causing damage to cellular DNA. This was unexpected because the DNA UV absorption spectrum indicates a negligible probability that photons of wavelengths longer than 320 nm will be directly absorbed. The most common defects induced in DNA by UVB are pyrimidine photoproducts, such as thymidine dimers. UVA photons produce defects resembling those caused by ionizing radiations: single- and double-strand breaks, and DNA-protein crosslinks. This paper also discusses the role of DNA repair mechanisms in UVA-induced defects and the molecular mechanisms of UVA damage induction. 38 refs. (MHB)

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; NIOSH; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Rockville, MD (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6106470
Report Number(s):
ANL/CP-73713; CONF-9110280-1
ON: DE92003447
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Biologic effects of light symposium, Atlanta, GA (United States), 13-15 Oct 1991
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; DNA; RADIATION EFFECTS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; CARCINOGENESIS; CELL CULTURES; DIMERS; DNA ADDUCTS; DNA REPAIR; MAMMALS; REVIEWS; STRAND BREAKS; ADDUCTS; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL RECOVERY; BIOLOGICAL REPAIR; DOCUMENT TYPES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; NUCLEIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PATHOGENESIS; RADIATIONS; RECOVERY; REPAIR; VERTEBRATES; 560100* - Biomedical Sciences, Applied Studies- Radiation Effects

Citation Formats

Peak, M.J., and Peak, J.G. Effects of solar ultraviolet photons on mammalian cell DNA. [UVA (320-400 nm):a2]. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Peak, M.J., & Peak, J.G. Effects of solar ultraviolet photons on mammalian cell DNA. [UVA (320-400 nm):a2]. United States.
Peak, M.J., and Peak, J.G. Tue . "Effects of solar ultraviolet photons on mammalian cell DNA. [UVA (320-400 nm):a2]". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6106470.
@article{osti_6106470,
title = {Effects of solar ultraviolet photons on mammalian cell DNA. [UVA (320-400 nm):a2]},
author = {Peak, M.J. and Peak, J.G.},
abstractNote = {This document presents information on the possible mechanisms of carcinogenesis caused by UVA (ultraviolet radiation in the 320--400 nm region). Most studies showing the carcinogenic effects of ultraviolet light have concentrated on UVB (280--320 nm). UVA had been considered harmless even though it penetrates biological tissues better than UVB. Recently, it has become apparent that UVA is also capable of causing damage to cellular DNA. This was unexpected because the DNA UV absorption spectrum indicates a negligible probability that photons of wavelengths longer than 320 nm will be directly absorbed. The most common defects induced in DNA by UVB are pyrimidine photoproducts, such as thymidine dimers. UVA photons produce defects resembling those caused by ionizing radiations: single- and double-strand breaks, and DNA-protein crosslinks. This paper also discusses the role of DNA repair mechanisms in UVA-induced defects and the molecular mechanisms of UVA damage induction. 38 refs. (MHB)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1991},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: