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Title: Carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide levels in an indoor ice skating rink with mitigation methods

Abstract

An indoor ice skating rink is an enclosed space with intermittent air pollutant emissions from fuel-powered ice-resurfacing equipment, such as a resurfacer and an edger. Exhaust gases discharged from the resurfacing equipment actually include significant quantities of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO[sub 2]) which may induced adverse health effects. Carbon monoxide exposures in ice skating rinks resulting from malfunctioning ice resurfacing equipment were first reported more than twenty years ago. Attempts to reduce emissions of CO and NO[sub 2] form resurfacing equipment, such as the extended exhaust pipe, operation of the air recirculation system or reduced resurfacer operation, appeared not to be effective for maintaining the air pollutant concentrations below guidelines. Even though improved indoor air quality was obtained by the combination of the full operation of the air exhaust system and the reduced number of resurfacer operations in this investigation, these methods may be impractical for most skating rinks. Replacement of the fuel-powered resurfacer with a battery operated resurfacer is recommended. If replacement is not feasible, then increasing the air ventilation rate is recommended as a second choice. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6103976
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 43:5; Journal ID: ISSN 1047-3289
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; EXHAUST GASES; HAZARDS; SKATING RINKS; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; CARBON MONOXIDE; INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; NITROGEN DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; ENGINES; FLUIDS; GASEOUS WASTES; GASES; HEAT ENGINES; MONITORING; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN OXIDES; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; WASTES; 020900* - Petroleum- Environmental Aspects; 540120 - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Lee, K., Yanagisawa, Y., and Spengler, J.D. Carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide levels in an indoor ice skating rink with mitigation methods. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.1080/1073161X.1993.10467160.
Lee, K., Yanagisawa, Y., & Spengler, J.D. Carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide levels in an indoor ice skating rink with mitigation methods. United States. doi:10.1080/1073161X.1993.10467160.
Lee, K., Yanagisawa, Y., and Spengler, J.D. Sat . "Carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide levels in an indoor ice skating rink with mitigation methods". United States. doi:10.1080/1073161X.1993.10467160.
@article{osti_6103976,
title = {Carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide levels in an indoor ice skating rink with mitigation methods},
author = {Lee, K. and Yanagisawa, Y. and Spengler, J.D.},
abstractNote = {An indoor ice skating rink is an enclosed space with intermittent air pollutant emissions from fuel-powered ice-resurfacing equipment, such as a resurfacer and an edger. Exhaust gases discharged from the resurfacing equipment actually include significant quantities of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO[sub 2]) which may induced adverse health effects. Carbon monoxide exposures in ice skating rinks resulting from malfunctioning ice resurfacing equipment were first reported more than twenty years ago. Attempts to reduce emissions of CO and NO[sub 2] form resurfacing equipment, such as the extended exhaust pipe, operation of the air recirculation system or reduced resurfacer operation, appeared not to be effective for maintaining the air pollutant concentrations below guidelines. Even though improved indoor air quality was obtained by the combination of the full operation of the air exhaust system and the reduced number of resurfacer operations in this investigation, these methods may be impractical for most skating rinks. Replacement of the fuel-powered resurfacer with a battery operated resurfacer is recommended. If replacement is not feasible, then increasing the air ventilation rate is recommended as a second choice. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.},
doi = {10.1080/1073161X.1993.10467160},
journal = {Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association; (United States)},
issn = {1047-3289},
number = ,
volume = 43:5,
place = {United States},
year = {1993},
month = {5}
}