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Title: High angle mining system. Task report: system requirements, performance specifications, and review of state-of-the-art technology

Abstract

The candidate mining systems compared are limited to existing systems operable from the surface and which have at least a limited down-seam capability. A normal down-dip limitation of 15-degrees is shown for augers. At this angle conveying performance of the auger screw decreases slightly. At about 25 degrees, borehole packing begins to occur and conveying efficiency is substantially reduced. Higher rotational speeds and a shorter screw pitch can improve conveying performance to some extent. The ultimate limit of 30 degrees is based on a partially successful attempt at this angle by a 30-inch triple-head auger at the Canmore Mine near Calgary, Alberta. While 10-foot-diameter holes were accomplished in Kentucky by a Compton auger machine, 7 feet is believed to be the largest practical size. The deepest known penetration depth for a 7-foot diameter is 150 feet. The largest practical size for a twin-head auger would produce a 3-foot-high by 6-foot-wide oval hole about 150 feet deep. The largest practical diameter for a 200-foot penetration depth is believed to be about 42 inches. Not discussed in detail are the British-developed Collins Mining System or the square auger developed by Coaltex. Both of these have, or will have, advanced steering systems andmore » should be capable of greater penetration depths than conventional augering. The efficiency factors are derived from the horizontal tonnage capacity and the gross horsepower for each machine. All of the continuous miners discussed have operated or are believed capable of operating down-dip to the normal pitch limit shown without assistance or modification.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FMC Corp., Santa Clara, CA (USA). Engineered Systems Div.
OSTI Identifier:
6101117
Report Number(s):
DOE/ET/14257-2
ON: DE82001078
DOE Contract Number:
AC01-80ET14257
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; AUGER MINING; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; UNDERGROUND MINING; MINING EQUIPMENT; COAL MINING; CONTINUOUS MINERS; CONVEYORS; CUTTING TOOLS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; INCLINED STRATA; CUTTER LOADERS; DATA; EQUIPMENT; GEOLOGIC STRATA; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; HAULAGE EQUIPMENT; INFORMATION; MATERIALS HANDLING EQUIPMENT; MINING; NUMERICAL DATA; TOOLS; 012000* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Mining

Citation Formats

Brown, E.G. High angle mining system. Task report: system requirements, performance specifications, and review of state-of-the-art technology. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Brown, E.G. High angle mining system. Task report: system requirements, performance specifications, and review of state-of-the-art technology. United States.
Brown, E.G. Thu . "High angle mining system. Task report: system requirements, performance specifications, and review of state-of-the-art technology". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6101117,
title = {High angle mining system. Task report: system requirements, performance specifications, and review of state-of-the-art technology},
author = {Brown, E.G.},
abstractNote = {The candidate mining systems compared are limited to existing systems operable from the surface and which have at least a limited down-seam capability. A normal down-dip limitation of 15-degrees is shown for augers. At this angle conveying performance of the auger screw decreases slightly. At about 25 degrees, borehole packing begins to occur and conveying efficiency is substantially reduced. Higher rotational speeds and a shorter screw pitch can improve conveying performance to some extent. The ultimate limit of 30 degrees is based on a partially successful attempt at this angle by a 30-inch triple-head auger at the Canmore Mine near Calgary, Alberta. While 10-foot-diameter holes were accomplished in Kentucky by a Compton auger machine, 7 feet is believed to be the largest practical size. The deepest known penetration depth for a 7-foot diameter is 150 feet. The largest practical size for a twin-head auger would produce a 3-foot-high by 6-foot-wide oval hole about 150 feet deep. The largest practical diameter for a 200-foot penetration depth is believed to be about 42 inches. Not discussed in detail are the British-developed Collins Mining System or the square auger developed by Coaltex. Both of these have, or will have, advanced steering systems and should be capable of greater penetration depths than conventional augering. The efficiency factors are derived from the horizontal tonnage capacity and the gross horsepower for each machine. All of the continuous miners discussed have operated or are believed capable of operating down-dip to the normal pitch limit shown without assistance or modification.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1981},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1981}
}

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