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Title: Environmental planning and management

Abstract

The book provides a overview and discussion of all major aspects of environmental planning and management. It highlights the causes and interrelationships of environmental problems, emphasizing the important economic and ecological functions of the land as the stage for all human activities and the ''source'' and ''sink'' for all physical resources. A ''cradle to grave'' discussion of the flow of resources - from acquisition through transformation, distribution, and disposal - is a key feature of the book. The author proceeds from a review of the overall problems, principles, and practice of environmental planning and management to address the planning and management of water quality and quantity, air quality, toxic and solid wastes, and energy; the economic costs of environmental controls; and procedures for environmental impact statement writing and review. He concludes by summarizing the needs, alternatives, and practice of community environmental planning and management.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6101050
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6101050
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING; REVIEWS; LAND USE; PLANNING; AIR QUALITY; ECOLOGY; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; PLANNED COMMUNITIES; SOLID WASTES; TOXIC MATERIALS; URBAN AREAS; WATER QUALITY; WATER SUPPLY; COMMUNITIES; DOCUMENT TYPES; ECONOMICS; ENGINEERING; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; MATERIALS; WASTES 290300* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Environment, Health, & Safety; 290400 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Energy Resources; 290200 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics & Sociology

Citation Formats

Baldwin, J.H. Environmental planning and management. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Baldwin, J.H. Environmental planning and management. United States.
Baldwin, J.H. Sun . "Environmental planning and management". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6101050,
title = {Environmental planning and management},
author = {Baldwin, J.H.},
abstractNote = {The book provides a overview and discussion of all major aspects of environmental planning and management. It highlights the causes and interrelationships of environmental problems, emphasizing the important economic and ecological functions of the land as the stage for all human activities and the ''source'' and ''sink'' for all physical resources. A ''cradle to grave'' discussion of the flow of resources - from acquisition through transformation, distribution, and disposal - is a key feature of the book. The author proceeds from a review of the overall problems, principles, and practice of environmental planning and management to address the planning and management of water quality and quantity, air quality, toxic and solid wastes, and energy; the economic costs of environmental controls; and procedures for environmental impact statement writing and review. He concludes by summarizing the needs, alternatives, and practice of community environmental planning and management.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1984},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1984}
}

Book:
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