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Title: The nuclear power debate. A guide to the literature

Abstract

This book provides information on one of the hot issues of the day: nuclear power. Arranged for ease of use into three sections--''Pro-Nuclear,'' ''Anti-Nuclear,'' and ''Neutral''--the book cites over 100 of the most important recent books on the subject, offering for each full bibliographic data and a lengthy annotation.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6100905
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; NUCLEAR POWER; BIBLIOGRAPHIES; PUBLIC INFORMATION; PUBLIC OPINION; DOCUMENT TYPES; INFORMATION; POWER 290600* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Nuclear Energy; 290200 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics & Sociology

Citation Formats

Mansfield, J.W. The nuclear power debate. A guide to the literature. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Mansfield, J.W. The nuclear power debate. A guide to the literature. United States.
Mansfield, J.W. 1984. "The nuclear power debate. A guide to the literature". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6100905,
title = {The nuclear power debate. A guide to the literature},
author = {Mansfield, J.W.},
abstractNote = {This book provides information on one of the hot issues of the day: nuclear power. Arranged for ease of use into three sections--''Pro-Nuclear,'' ''Anti-Nuclear,'' and ''Neutral''--the book cites over 100 of the most important recent books on the subject, offering for each full bibliographic data and a lengthy annotation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 1
}

Book:
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  • This report examines the issues and ramifications of the debate over nuclear-power development. Following a review of the historical background of the debate, subsequent chapters discuss energy economy and nuclear power's role in it; the economics of nuclear power in relation to alternative energy options, especially coal-fired power; government's past involvement in nuclear-power development and the changing role that governmental institutions are playing in the debate; the nuclear power industry and the changes it is undergoing; the status of nuclear technology; the issue of nuclear-plant safety and the risks presented by the use of nuclear power; and the two majormore » safeguards issues of weapons proliferation and waste disposal associated with the use of nuclear fuel cycles. The author concludes that, given the direction the debate has taken, nuclear power development will be limited to only that which is necessary. 9 figures, 4 tables.« less
  • The pace at which nuclear power will develop is clouded with uncertainties. At the end of 1976 in the United States, 61 nuclear reactors were operating, representing slightly more than 9 percent of the country's total generating capacity. Another 168 reactors were either planned, under construction, or on order. Outside the United States, commitments to nuclear power grew by 17 percent in 1975 over 1974. Indonesia, Turkey, and Poland ordered nuclear plants, bringing to 41 the number of countries committed to nuclear energy. In 1976, 112 nuclear reactors were operating in 18 countries; an additional 342 plants were planned, onmore » order, or under construction. The speed at which nuclear power will continue to grow is dependent on a number of factors: the rate at which demand for energy increases, the changing economics of alternative methods of energy production, the processes by which decisions affecting nuclear power development are made, and the degree to which they satisfy public concerns about the safety of nuclear energy. This book addresses itself to these factors as follows: Economic issues: At what rate will demand for energy increase, and how can that demand be met. (Chapter 2.) How cost-competitive are the major alternative methods of producing electricity that now exist--nuclear power and coal. (Chapter 3.) Decision making issues: Are the processes by which decisions to proceed with development of nuclear power, both in government and in industry, adequate to protect the interests of the public and of investors. (Chapters 4 and 5.) Safety issues: Are nuclear power plants themselves safe. (Chapters 6 and 7.) Can adequate safeguards be established to ensure protection against misuse of the products or by-products of those plants and to ensure the permanent safe storage of radioactive wastes. (Chapter 8.)« less
  • The following aspects of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants are discussed: generation of radioactive wastes and the health hazards posed by radioactivity; radioactive waste management programs, plans, and alternatives, U. S. experience with radioactive waste management, and citizen action. (LK)