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Title: Clearance of chrysotile asbestos from human lung

Abstract

In contrast to amphibole asbestos, chrysotile asbestos fails to accumulate in human lungs. The reason for this phenomenon is not known. To examine this problem, we extracted chrysotile and tremolite fibers from the lungs of 11 chrysotile miners and millers whose last exposure was within 2 years of death and 12 chrysotile miners and millers whose last exposure was greater than 12 years (7 with last exposure 12-15 years and 5 with last exposure 22-25 years) before death. Fibers were extracted by bleach digestion, and concentrations, compositions, and sizes were determined by analytical electron microscopy. Native UICC Canadian chrysotile was used as a composition standard. Compared to the standard, there was minor loss of magnesium at 2 years and additional very slight loss after 12 years. The ratio of chrysotile to tremolite concentration did not change with time. There was also no evidence of increasing fiber length with time from last exposure. These data indicate that accumulation of amphibole compared to chrysotile in human lungs does not reflect either long-term dissolution of chrysotile or long-term preferential clearance of chrysotile compared to amphibole. Contrary to results of animal studies, fiber length in humans does not increase with time since last exposure.more » These findings imply that the failure of chrysotile to accumulate in human lungs reflects events that occur early after exposure rather than long-term clearance mechanisms.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)
OSTI Identifier:
6071371
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Exp. Lung Res.; (United States); Journal Volume: 14:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ASBESTOS; LUNG CLEARANCE; INDUSTRY; MAN; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; TOXICITY; ANIMALS; CLEARANCE; EXCRETION; MAMMALS; PRIMATES; VERTEBRATES; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Churg, A., and DePaoli, L. Clearance of chrysotile asbestos from human lung. United States: N. p., 1988. Web. doi:10.3109/01902148809087829.
Churg, A., & DePaoli, L. Clearance of chrysotile asbestos from human lung. United States. doi:10.3109/01902148809087829.
Churg, A., and DePaoli, L. Fri . "Clearance of chrysotile asbestos from human lung". United States. doi:10.3109/01902148809087829.
@article{osti_6071371,
title = {Clearance of chrysotile asbestos from human lung},
author = {Churg, A. and DePaoli, L.},
abstractNote = {In contrast to amphibole asbestos, chrysotile asbestos fails to accumulate in human lungs. The reason for this phenomenon is not known. To examine this problem, we extracted chrysotile and tremolite fibers from the lungs of 11 chrysotile miners and millers whose last exposure was within 2 years of death and 12 chrysotile miners and millers whose last exposure was greater than 12 years (7 with last exposure 12-15 years and 5 with last exposure 22-25 years) before death. Fibers were extracted by bleach digestion, and concentrations, compositions, and sizes were determined by analytical electron microscopy. Native UICC Canadian chrysotile was used as a composition standard. Compared to the standard, there was minor loss of magnesium at 2 years and additional very slight loss after 12 years. The ratio of chrysotile to tremolite concentration did not change with time. There was also no evidence of increasing fiber length with time from last exposure. These data indicate that accumulation of amphibole compared to chrysotile in human lungs does not reflect either long-term dissolution of chrysotile or long-term preferential clearance of chrysotile compared to amphibole. Contrary to results of animal studies, fiber length in humans does not increase with time since last exposure. These findings imply that the failure of chrysotile to accumulate in human lungs reflects events that occur early after exposure rather than long-term clearance mechanisms.},
doi = {10.3109/01902148809087829},
journal = {Exp. Lung Res.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 14:5,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1988},
month = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1988}
}