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Title: Second primary tumors following radiotherapy for childhood cancer

Abstract

Among a cohort of 9,279 survivors of childhood neoplasms other than retinoblastoma treated in Britain before 1980, the cumulative risk of a second primary tumor (SPT) by 25 years from 3-year survival was 3.7%. This corresponds to about five times the number expected from rates of cancer occurring in the general population. In the absence of both radiotherapy and chemotherapy, there was four times the expected number of subsequent cancers. The risk of an SPT associated with radiotherapy but not chemotherapy and both radiotherapy and chemotherapy were 6 and 9 times that expected, respectively. There is evidence that radiotherapy was involved in the development of many of the SPT's observed. However, case-control investigations are required to examine the relationship between relative risk of an SPT and therapy in detail. Secondary leukemia appears to occur more frequently among more recently diagnosed children with cancer. It is important to continue to monitor the occurrence of SPT's with a view to identifying the least carcinogenic therapies that are consistent with not compromising survival prospects.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (England))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6069237
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; (USA); Journal Volume: 19:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; LEUKEMIA; RADIOINDUCTION; RADIOTHERAPY; SIDE EFFECTS; CHEMOTHERAPY; CHILDREN; DELAYED RADIATION EFFECTS; NEOPLASMS; RISK ASSESSMENT; SURVIVAL CURVES; UNITED KINGDOM; AGE GROUPS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; DISEASES; EUROPE; HEMIC DISEASES; IMMUNE SYSTEM DISEASES; MEDICINE; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIOLOGY; THERAPY; WESTERN EUROPE; 550603* - Medicine- External Radiation in Therapy- (1980-); 560151 - Radiation Effects on Animals- Man

Citation Formats

Hawkins, M.M.. Second primary tumors following radiotherapy for childhood cancer. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(90)90248-I.
Hawkins, M.M.. Second primary tumors following radiotherapy for childhood cancer. United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(90)90248-I.
Hawkins, M.M.. Thu . "Second primary tumors following radiotherapy for childhood cancer". United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(90)90248-I.
@article{osti_6069237,
title = {Second primary tumors following radiotherapy for childhood cancer},
author = {Hawkins, M.M.},
abstractNote = {Among a cohort of 9,279 survivors of childhood neoplasms other than retinoblastoma treated in Britain before 1980, the cumulative risk of a second primary tumor (SPT) by 25 years from 3-year survival was 3.7%. This corresponds to about five times the number expected from rates of cancer occurring in the general population. In the absence of both radiotherapy and chemotherapy, there was four times the expected number of subsequent cancers. The risk of an SPT associated with radiotherapy but not chemotherapy and both radiotherapy and chemotherapy were 6 and 9 times that expected, respectively. There is evidence that radiotherapy was involved in the development of many of the SPT's observed. However, case-control investigations are required to examine the relationship between relative risk of an SPT and therapy in detail. Secondary leukemia appears to occur more frequently among more recently diagnosed children with cancer. It is important to continue to monitor the occurrence of SPT's with a view to identifying the least carcinogenic therapies that are consistent with not compromising survival prospects.},
doi = {10.1016/0360-3016(90)90248-I},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 19:5,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1990},
month = {Thu Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1990}
}