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Title: Energy generation and the sulfur-carbon cycle. Progress report

Abstract

Laboratory studies demonstrated that a variety of anaerobic bacterial species actively reduced dimethylsulfoxide as an electron acceptor while oxidizing organic substrates as electron donors during growth. The microbial decomposition of methionine in anaerobic Lake Mendota sediments, methanethiol and dimethylsulfide were detected as intermediates; whereas, methane, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide were the final end products of anaerobic decomposition. Dimethylsulfide and methylmercaptan were immediate methane precursors in Lake Mendota sediments. The oxidation of methane by anaerobic bacteria and characterization of an acetate fermenting methanogenic bacterium were studied. Cultures of methanogenic bacteria demonstrated that methanogens converted /sup 14/CH/sub 4/ to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ by a pathway that involved different cellular intermediates than those involved in methane production. The general physiological properties of an acetate fermenting methanogen isolated from sewage sludge was characterized. Most notably, this species would not grow on H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/. Studies on the influence of sulfate metabolism on carbon turnover in Lake Mendota suggested that approximately 50% of the reduced endogenous carbon was mineralized via sulfate reduction and 50% via methanogenesis. Most of the endogenous carbon mineralized via sulfate reduction occurred in the surface sediments. Sulfate reduction was not limited by in situ sulfate concentration in surfacemore » sediments. Studies on biopolymer decomposition showed in situ turnover rate constants for /sup 14/C-pectin of 0.11 h/sup -1/ in Lake Mendota sediments and 0.004 h/sup -1/ in Knaack Lake. The number of anaerobic pectin degrading bacteria in the sediments of both lakes varied with seasons. (ERB)« less

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Wisconsin Univ., Madison (USA). Dept. of Bacteriology
OSTI Identifier:
6052320
Report Number(s):
DOE/EV/02161-T1
ON: DE81030949
DOE Contract Number:  
AS02-76EV02161
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; DMSO; REDUCTION; METHANOGENIC BACTERIA; METABOLISM; ACETATES; FERMENTATION; METHANE; OXIDATION; LAKES; CARBON CYCLE; PECTINS; DECOMPOSITION; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON 14 COMPOUNDS; TRACER TECHNIQUES; ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS; METHIONINE; BACTERIA; BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; CORRELATIONS; SEDIMENTS; SULFATES; ENZYME ACTIVITY; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; GREAT SALT LAKE; ALKANES; AMINO ACIDS; BIOCONVERSION; BLOOD SUBSTITUTES; CARBOHYDRATES; CARBOXYLIC ACID SALTS; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DRUGS; HEMATOLOGIC AGENTS; HYDROCARBONS; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; KINETICS; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; LIPOTROPIC FACTORS; MICROORGANISMS; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC SULFUR COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLYSACCHARIDES; REACTION KINETICS; SACCHARIDES; SULFOXIDES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SURFACE WATERS; VARIATIONS; 090100* - Hydrocarbon Fuels- (-1989); 520100 - Environment, Aquatic- Basic Studies- (-1989); 550700 - Microbiology; 550500 - Metabolism; 550200 - Biochemistry

Citation Formats

. Energy generation and the sulfur-carbon cycle. Progress report. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
. Energy generation and the sulfur-carbon cycle. Progress report. United States.
. Thu . "Energy generation and the sulfur-carbon cycle. Progress report". United States.
@article{osti_6052320,
title = {Energy generation and the sulfur-carbon cycle. Progress report},
author = {},
abstractNote = {Laboratory studies demonstrated that a variety of anaerobic bacterial species actively reduced dimethylsulfoxide as an electron acceptor while oxidizing organic substrates as electron donors during growth. The microbial decomposition of methionine in anaerobic Lake Mendota sediments, methanethiol and dimethylsulfide were detected as intermediates; whereas, methane, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide were the final end products of anaerobic decomposition. Dimethylsulfide and methylmercaptan were immediate methane precursors in Lake Mendota sediments. The oxidation of methane by anaerobic bacteria and characterization of an acetate fermenting methanogenic bacterium were studied. Cultures of methanogenic bacteria demonstrated that methanogens converted /sup 14/CH/sub 4/ to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ by a pathway that involved different cellular intermediates than those involved in methane production. The general physiological properties of an acetate fermenting methanogen isolated from sewage sludge was characterized. Most notably, this species would not grow on H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/. Studies on the influence of sulfate metabolism on carbon turnover in Lake Mendota suggested that approximately 50% of the reduced endogenous carbon was mineralized via sulfate reduction and 50% via methanogenesis. Most of the endogenous carbon mineralized via sulfate reduction occurred in the surface sediments. Sulfate reduction was not limited by in situ sulfate concentration in surface sediments. Studies on biopolymer decomposition showed in situ turnover rate constants for /sup 14/C-pectin of 0.11 h/sup -1/ in Lake Mendota sediments and 0.004 h/sup -1/ in Knaack Lake. The number of anaerobic pectin degrading bacteria in the sediments of both lakes varied with seasons. (ERB)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1981},
month = {1}
}

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