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Title: Asbestos content in lungs of occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed individuals

Abstract

Previous reports have indicated that a majority of the population has asbestos bodies within their lungs. These studies generally have been carried out using cohorts from urban environments. The present study compares the asbestos body levels from three unique cohorts: (1) a nonoccupationally exposed group from a large urban environment having a relatively low asbestos content, (2) patients with lung cancer from a nonurban setting, and (3) amosite asbestos workers, who worked and lived in a rural setting. The number of asbestos bodies in both the urban nonoccupationally exposed group and the patients with lung cancer was generally found to be low or below limits of detectability, with the exceptions being those persons in whom an occupational exposure was eventually found. The ferruginous body content of the occupationally exposed group varied considerably between individuals as well as between sites within the same individual.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Texas Health Center, Tyler
OSTI Identifier:
6051348
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: JAMA, J. Am. Med. Assoc.; (United States); Journal Volume: 252:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ASBESTOS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; LUNGS; CONTAMINATION; SAMPLING; AUTOPSY; NEOPLASMS; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; PATIENTS; PERSONNEL; RURAL AREAS; URBAN AREAS; BODY; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DISEASES; ORGANS; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; 560306* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Dodson, R.F., Greenberg, S.D., Williams, M.G. Jr., Corn, C.J., O'Sullivan, M.F., and Hurst, G.A. Asbestos content in lungs of occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed individuals. United States: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.1001/jama.252.1.68.
Dodson, R.F., Greenberg, S.D., Williams, M.G. Jr., Corn, C.J., O'Sullivan, M.F., & Hurst, G.A. Asbestos content in lungs of occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed individuals. United States. doi:10.1001/jama.252.1.68.
Dodson, R.F., Greenberg, S.D., Williams, M.G. Jr., Corn, C.J., O'Sullivan, M.F., and Hurst, G.A. Fri . "Asbestos content in lungs of occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed individuals". United States. doi:10.1001/jama.252.1.68.
@article{osti_6051348,
title = {Asbestos content in lungs of occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed individuals},
author = {Dodson, R.F. and Greenberg, S.D. and Williams, M.G. Jr. and Corn, C.J. and O'Sullivan, M.F. and Hurst, G.A.},
abstractNote = {Previous reports have indicated that a majority of the population has asbestos bodies within their lungs. These studies generally have been carried out using cohorts from urban environments. The present study compares the asbestos body levels from three unique cohorts: (1) a nonoccupationally exposed group from a large urban environment having a relatively low asbestos content, (2) patients with lung cancer from a nonurban setting, and (3) amosite asbestos workers, who worked and lived in a rural setting. The number of asbestos bodies in both the urban nonoccupationally exposed group and the patients with lung cancer was generally found to be low or below limits of detectability, with the exceptions being those persons in whom an occupational exposure was eventually found. The ferruginous body content of the occupationally exposed group varied considerably between individuals as well as between sites within the same individual.},
doi = {10.1001/jama.252.1.68},
journal = {JAMA, J. Am. Med. Assoc.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 252:1,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 1984},
month = {Fri Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 1984}
}
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