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Title: Persistence and chemical distribution of arsanilic acid in three soils

Abstract

The persistence and chemical distribution of 4-aminobenzene arsonic acid (arsanilic acid), the Lakeland sandy loam, Hagerstown silty clay loam, and Christiana clay loam was examined. Two application rates (158 and 790 ppm) and two moisture levels (75% field capacity and flooded) were established. The flooded soil was used to establish anaerobic conditions. Arsanilic acid was determined spectrophotometrically (520 nm) as the N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine derivative; arsenic (840 nm) as an arsenomolybdenum blue complex. Total arsanilic acid, extracted sequentially by N NH/sub 4/Cl, 0.5 N NH/sub 4/F, 0.1 N NaOH, and 0.5 N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 32 weeks, disappeared from all three soils at a relatively rapid rate, whereas total As remained constant. At the end of 32 weeks, less than 10% of the applied arsanilic acid could be extracted from any soil. With time, extractable arsenic became greater than extractable arsanilic acid at both rates and both moisture levels in the Hagerstown and Christiana soils. However, in Lakeland sandy loam, the extractable arsenic and arsanilic acid contents were the same under aerobic conditions; in the anaerobic soil, extractable arsenic was 5 times that of arsanilic acid. Based on extraction behavior, arsanilic acid formed saltsmore » with aluminum, iron, and calcium in the soil in the same manner as arsenate. Conversion of arsanilic acid to arsenate occurred at both soil moisture levels.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6027900
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ARSANILIC ACID; SOIL CHEMISTRY; ALUMINIUM; ARSENATES; ARSENIC; CALCIUM; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; GROUND WATER; IRON; SALTS; SOILS; ALKALINE EARTH METALS; AMINES; ARSENIC COMPOUNDS; ARSONIC ACIDS; CHEMISTRY; ELEMENTS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; MASS TRANSFER; METALS; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC ARSENIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SEMIMETALS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; WATER; 510200* - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Woolson, E A. Persistence and chemical distribution of arsanilic acid in three soils. United States: N. p., 1974. Web.
Woolson, E A. Persistence and chemical distribution of arsanilic acid in three soils. United States.
Woolson, E A. Tue . "Persistence and chemical distribution of arsanilic acid in three soils". United States.
@article{osti_6027900,
title = {Persistence and chemical distribution of arsanilic acid in three soils},
author = {Woolson, E A},
abstractNote = {The persistence and chemical distribution of 4-aminobenzene arsonic acid (arsanilic acid), the Lakeland sandy loam, Hagerstown silty clay loam, and Christiana clay loam was examined. Two application rates (158 and 790 ppm) and two moisture levels (75% field capacity and flooded) were established. The flooded soil was used to establish anaerobic conditions. Arsanilic acid was determined spectrophotometrically (520 nm) as the N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine derivative; arsenic (840 nm) as an arsenomolybdenum blue complex. Total arsanilic acid, extracted sequentially by N NH/sub 4/Cl, 0.5 N NH/sub 4/F, 0.1 N NaOH, and 0.5 N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 32 weeks, disappeared from all three soils at a relatively rapid rate, whereas total As remained constant. At the end of 32 weeks, less than 10% of the applied arsanilic acid could be extracted from any soil. With time, extractable arsenic became greater than extractable arsanilic acid at both rates and both moisture levels in the Hagerstown and Christiana soils. However, in Lakeland sandy loam, the extractable arsenic and arsanilic acid contents were the same under aerobic conditions; in the anaerobic soil, extractable arsenic was 5 times that of arsanilic acid. Based on extraction behavior, arsanilic acid formed salts with aluminum, iron, and calcium in the soil in the same manner as arsenate. Conversion of arsanilic acid to arsenate occurred at both soil moisture levels.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6027900}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1974},
month = {1}
}

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