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Title: Geothermal pilot projects on utilization of low-temperature reserves in Hungary

Abstract

The Hungarian Oil and Gas Company (MOL Co.) started a programme (MOL-Geothermy Project) in 1995. The main purpose is to decide whether the abandoned oil and gas wells (more than 2000 wells) are suitable for thermal water production and reinjection. The MOL-Geothermy Project consists of three geothermal pilot projects. Two of them are based on low- and medium-enthalpy geothermal reserves, the third one is concentrated on the utilization of geopressured type of geothermal reserves being unique in the World. This paper gives a summary of the pre-feasibility study of two projects and determines the activities planned in the feasibility stages of the projects.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
602696
Report Number(s):
CONF-971048-
TRN: 98:001318-0043
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) annual meeting, San Francisco, CA (United States), 12 Oct 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Meeting the challenge of increased competition; PB: 665 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; 58 GEOSCIENCES; GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT; REINJECTION; HUNGARY; OIL WELLS; NATURAL GAS WELLS; REENTRY; FEASIBILITY STUDIES

Citation Formats

Arpasi, M., Pota, G., and Andristyaka, A.. Geothermal pilot projects on utilization of low-temperature reserves in Hungary. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Arpasi, M., Pota, G., & Andristyaka, A.. Geothermal pilot projects on utilization of low-temperature reserves in Hungary. United States.
Arpasi, M., Pota, G., and Andristyaka, A.. 1997. "Geothermal pilot projects on utilization of low-temperature reserves in Hungary". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_602696,
title = {Geothermal pilot projects on utilization of low-temperature reserves in Hungary},
author = {Arpasi, M. and Pota, G. and Andristyaka, A.},
abstractNote = {The Hungarian Oil and Gas Company (MOL Co.) started a programme (MOL-Geothermy Project) in 1995. The main purpose is to decide whether the abandoned oil and gas wells (more than 2000 wells) are suitable for thermal water production and reinjection. The MOL-Geothermy Project consists of three geothermal pilot projects. Two of them are based on low- and medium-enthalpy geothermal reserves, the third one is concentrated on the utilization of geopressured type of geothermal reserves being unique in the World. This paper gives a summary of the pre-feasibility study of two projects and determines the activities planned in the feasibility stages of the projects.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1997,
month =
}

Conference:
Other availability
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