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Title: Analytical cytology applied to detection of induced cytogenetic abnormalities

Abstract

Radiation-induced biological damage results in formation of a broad spectrum of cytogenetic changes such as translocations, dicentrics, ring chromosomes, and acentric fragments. A battery of analytical cytologic techniques are now emerging that promise to significantly improve the precision and ease with which these radiation induced cytogenetic changes can be quantified. This report summarizes techniques to facilitate analysis of the frequency of occurrence of structural and numerical aberrations in control and irradiated human cells. 14 refs., 2 figs.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6026759
Report Number(s):
UCRL-97276; CONF-870701-8
ON: DE88000785; TRN: 87-041330
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 8. international congress of radiation research, Edinburgh, UK, 19 Jul 1987; Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ACROCENTRIC CHROMOSOMES; CHROMOSOME SORTING; DICENTRIC CHROMOSOMES; RING CHROMOSOMES; ANEUPLOIDY; CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE; HEREDITARY DISEASES; RADIOBIOLOGY; BIOLOGY; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; CHROMOSOMES; DISEASES; MUTATIONS; PLOIDY; 560120* - Radiation Effects on Biochemicals, Cells, & Tissue Culture; 550400 - Genetics; 550200 - Biochemistry

Citation Formats

Gray, J.W., Lucas, J., Straume, T., and Pinkel, D. Analytical cytology applied to detection of induced cytogenetic abnormalities. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Gray, J.W., Lucas, J., Straume, T., & Pinkel, D. Analytical cytology applied to detection of induced cytogenetic abnormalities. United States.
Gray, J.W., Lucas, J., Straume, T., and Pinkel, D. Thu . "Analytical cytology applied to detection of induced cytogenetic abnormalities". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6026759.
@article{osti_6026759,
title = {Analytical cytology applied to detection of induced cytogenetic abnormalities},
author = {Gray, J.W. and Lucas, J. and Straume, T. and Pinkel, D.},
abstractNote = {Radiation-induced biological damage results in formation of a broad spectrum of cytogenetic changes such as translocations, dicentrics, ring chromosomes, and acentric fragments. A battery of analytical cytologic techniques are now emerging that promise to significantly improve the precision and ease with which these radiation induced cytogenetic changes can be quantified. This report summarizes techniques to facilitate analysis of the frequency of occurrence of structural and numerical aberrations in control and irradiated human cells. 14 refs., 2 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Aug 06 00:00:00 EDT 1987},
month = {Thu Aug 06 00:00:00 EDT 1987}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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