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Title: Cretaceous and Tertiary compressional tectonics as cause of Sabine arch, eastern Texas and northwestern Louisiana

Abstract

The Sabine arch is a large (12,000 mi/sup 2/ or 31,080 km/sup 2/) low-amplitude anticline centered on the Texas-Louisiana border. A basement-cored feature formed in the Jurassic, the arch has been interpreted as (1) a Jurassic horst that persisted throughout the Cretaceous as a topographic relict of rifting, (2) a dome caused by deep-seated Cretaceous plutonism, and (3) a fold caused by regional tectonism. Using regional maps and cross sections derived from 811 well logs, they tested models of the Sabine arch origin by establishing arch movement history. Their results show that the horst and plutonic dome models do not adequately explain the cause of the Sabine arch.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6025441
Report Number(s):
CONF-8810362-
Journal ID: CODEN: AABUD
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AAPG (Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol.) Bull.; (United States); Journal Volume: 72:9; Conference: Gulf Coast Association of the Geological Society and Gulf Coast Section of SEPM meeting, New Orleans, LA, USA, 19 Oct 1988
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; LOUISIANA; GEOLOGIC HISTORY; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; TEXAS; CRETACEOUS PERIOD; JURASSIC PERIOD; PETROLEUM GEOLOGY; TERTIARY PERIOD; CENOZOIC ERA; FEDERAL REGION VI; GEOLOGIC AGES; GEOLOGY; MESOZOIC ERA; NORTH AMERICA; USA 020200* -- Petroleum-- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration

Citation Formats

Jackson, M.L.W., and Laubach, S.E. Cretaceous and Tertiary compressional tectonics as cause of Sabine arch, eastern Texas and northwestern Louisiana. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Jackson, M.L.W., & Laubach, S.E. Cretaceous and Tertiary compressional tectonics as cause of Sabine arch, eastern Texas and northwestern Louisiana. United States.
Jackson, M.L.W., and Laubach, S.E. 1988. "Cretaceous and Tertiary compressional tectonics as cause of Sabine arch, eastern Texas and northwestern Louisiana". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6025441,
title = {Cretaceous and Tertiary compressional tectonics as cause of Sabine arch, eastern Texas and northwestern Louisiana},
author = {Jackson, M.L.W. and Laubach, S.E.},
abstractNote = {The Sabine arch is a large (12,000 mi/sup 2/ or 31,080 km/sup 2/) low-amplitude anticline centered on the Texas-Louisiana border. A basement-cored feature formed in the Jurassic, the arch has been interpreted as (1) a Jurassic horst that persisted throughout the Cretaceous as a topographic relict of rifting, (2) a dome caused by deep-seated Cretaceous plutonism, and (3) a fold caused by regional tectonism. Using regional maps and cross sections derived from 811 well logs, they tested models of the Sabine arch origin by establishing arch movement history. Their results show that the horst and plutonic dome models do not adequately explain the cause of the Sabine arch.},
doi = {},
journal = {AAPG (Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol.) Bull.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 72:9,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 9
}

Conference:
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