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Title: Effect of infant cereals on zinc and copper absorption during weaning

Abstract

Zinc and copper absorption from five infant cereal products mixed with water, human milk, or cow's milk was measured using an in vivo absorption model (rat pup) involving gastric intubation of extrinsically radiolabeled diets. Whole-body copper 64 uptake, nine hours after intubation, ranged from 14% to 31% of the dose given for the different cereal combinations. The resultant bioavailability of copper from human milk-cereal combinations (23% to 26%) was significantly lower than that from human milk alone (38%). Whole-body zinc 65 uptake, nine hours after intubation, ranged from 13% to 54% of the dose given for the different cereal combinations. These values were significantly lower than the whole-body zinc 65 uptake from milk alone (61%). Zinc availability was lower (13% to 25%) from dry cereal combinations that contained phytic acid (oatmeal and high-protein varieties) compared with the ready-to-serve cereal-fruit combinations (24% to 54%). The highest zinc uptake (37% to 54%) was from rice-fruit combinations that do not contain phytic acid. We estimated the amounts of zinc and copper that would be absorbed from these cereal products and speculated on the potential impact of these foods on the weaning infant's zinc and copper nutriture. Depending on the feeding practices employed duringmore » the weaning period, it is apparent that infant cereals may compromise utilization of zinc and copper from milk diets during weaning.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Davis
OSTI Identifier:
6017445
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Am. J. Dis. Child.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 141:10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; COPPER; INTESTINAL ABSORPTION; METABOLISM; ZINC; BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY; BIOLOGICAL MODELS; CATTLE; CEREALS; COPPER 64; MAN; MILK; NUTRIENTS; PHYTIC ACID; RATS; TRACER TECHNIQUES; ZINC 65; ABSORPTION; ANIMALS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-PLUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BODY FLUIDS; COPPER ISOTOPES; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DOMESTIC ANIMALS; ELECTRON CAPTURE RADIOISOTOPES; ELEMENTS; ESTERS; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; FOOD; GRASS; HOURS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; ISOTOPES; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; METALS; NUCLEI; ODD-ODD NUCLEI; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS; PHOSPHORIC ACID ESTERS; PLANTS; PRIMATES; RADIOISOTOPES; RODENTS; RUMINANTS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; UPTAKE; VERTEBRATES; ZINC ISOTOPES; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology; 550501 - Metabolism- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Bell, J G, Keen, C L, and Loennerdal, B. Effect of infant cereals on zinc and copper absorption during weaning. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460100106041.
Bell, J G, Keen, C L, & Loennerdal, B. Effect of infant cereals on zinc and copper absorption during weaning. United States. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460100106041
Bell, J G, Keen, C L, and Loennerdal, B. Thu . "Effect of infant cereals on zinc and copper absorption during weaning". United States. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460100106041.
@article{osti_6017445,
title = {Effect of infant cereals on zinc and copper absorption during weaning},
author = {Bell, J G and Keen, C L and Loennerdal, B},
abstractNote = {Zinc and copper absorption from five infant cereal products mixed with water, human milk, or cow's milk was measured using an in vivo absorption model (rat pup) involving gastric intubation of extrinsically radiolabeled diets. Whole-body copper 64 uptake, nine hours after intubation, ranged from 14% to 31% of the dose given for the different cereal combinations. The resultant bioavailability of copper from human milk-cereal combinations (23% to 26%) was significantly lower than that from human milk alone (38%). Whole-body zinc 65 uptake, nine hours after intubation, ranged from 13% to 54% of the dose given for the different cereal combinations. These values were significantly lower than the whole-body zinc 65 uptake from milk alone (61%). Zinc availability was lower (13% to 25%) from dry cereal combinations that contained phytic acid (oatmeal and high-protein varieties) compared with the ready-to-serve cereal-fruit combinations (24% to 54%). The highest zinc uptake (37% to 54%) was from rice-fruit combinations that do not contain phytic acid. We estimated the amounts of zinc and copper that would be absorbed from these cereal products and speculated on the potential impact of these foods on the weaning infant's zinc and copper nutriture. Depending on the feeding practices employed during the weaning period, it is apparent that infant cereals may compromise utilization of zinc and copper from milk diets during weaning.},
doi = {10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460100106041},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6017445}, journal = {Am. J. Dis. Child.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 141:10,
place = {United States},
year = {1987},
month = {10}
}