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Title: Hydrothermal pretreatment of coal

Abstract

We have examined changes in Argonne Premium samples of Wyodak coal following 30 min treatment in liquid water at autogenous pressures at 150{degrees}, 250{degrees}, and 350{degrees}C. In most runs the coal was initially dried at 60{degrees}C/1 torr/20 hr. The changes were monitored by pyrolysis field ionization mass spectrometry (py-FIMS) operating at 2.5{degrees}C/min from ambient to 500{degrees}C. We recorded the volatility patterns of the coal tars evolved over that temperature range, and in all cases the tar yields were 25%--30% of the starting coal on mass basis. There was essentially no change after the 150{degrees}C treatment. Small increases in volatility were seen following the 250{degrees}C treatment, but major effects were seen in the 350{degrees} work. The tar quantity remained unchanged; however, the volatility increased so the temperature of half volatility for the as-received coal of 400{degrees}C was reduced to 340{degrees}C. Control runs with no water showed some thermal effect, but the net effect from the presence of liquid water was clearly evident. The composition was unchanged after the 150{degrees} and 250{degrees}C treatments, but the 350{degrees} treatment brought about a 30% loss of oxygen. The change corresponded to loss of the elements of water, although loss of OH'' seemed to fit themore » analysis data somewhat better. The water loss takes place both in the presence and in the absence of added water, but it is noteworthy that the loss in the hydrothermal runs occurs at p(H{sub 2}O) = 160 atm. We conclude that the process must involve the dehydration solely of chemically bound elements of water, the dehydration of catechol is a specific, likely candidate.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6013254
Report Number(s):
DOE/PC/89880-T3
ON: DE92007743
DOE Contract Number:  
AC22-89PC89880
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COAL; HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION; COAL TAR; DEHYDRATION; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; PROGRESS REPORT; PYROLYSIS; VOLATILE MATTER; WATER REMOVAL; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DECOMPOSITION; DOCUMENT TYPES; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; MATERIALS; MATTER; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; REMOVAL; SPECTROSCOPY; TAR; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; 010300* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Preparation- (1987-); 010600 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Properties & Composition

Citation Formats

Ross, D.S.. Hydrothermal pretreatment of coal. United States: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.2172/6013254.
Ross, D.S.. Hydrothermal pretreatment of coal. United States. doi:10.2172/6013254.
Ross, D.S.. Thu . "Hydrothermal pretreatment of coal". United States. doi:10.2172/6013254. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6013254.
@article{osti_6013254,
title = {Hydrothermal pretreatment of coal},
author = {Ross, D.S.},
abstractNote = {We have examined changes in Argonne Premium samples of Wyodak coal following 30 min treatment in liquid water at autogenous pressures at 150{degrees}, 250{degrees}, and 350{degrees}C. In most runs the coal was initially dried at 60{degrees}C/1 torr/20 hr. The changes were monitored by pyrolysis field ionization mass spectrometry (py-FIMS) operating at 2.5{degrees}C/min from ambient to 500{degrees}C. We recorded the volatility patterns of the coal tars evolved over that temperature range, and in all cases the tar yields were 25%--30% of the starting coal on mass basis. There was essentially no change after the 150{degrees}C treatment. Small increases in volatility were seen following the 250{degrees}C treatment, but major effects were seen in the 350{degrees} work. The tar quantity remained unchanged; however, the volatility increased so the temperature of half volatility for the as-received coal of 400{degrees}C was reduced to 340{degrees}C. Control runs with no water showed some thermal effect, but the net effect from the presence of liquid water was clearly evident. The composition was unchanged after the 150{degrees} and 250{degrees}C treatments, but the 350{degrees} treatment brought about a 30% loss of oxygen. The change corresponded to loss of the elements of water, although loss of OH'' seemed to fit the analysis data somewhat better. The water loss takes place both in the presence and in the absence of added water, but it is noteworthy that the loss in the hydrothermal runs occurs at p(H{sub 2}O) = 160 atm. We conclude that the process must involve the dehydration solely of chemically bound elements of water, the dehydration of catechol is a specific, likely candidate.},
doi = {10.2172/6013254},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1989},
month = {12}
}