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Title: Long-term storage stability of diesel fuels

Abstract

Storage stability of different diesel fuels containing cat-cracked stocks was examined using various aging conditions. The degradation of fuel during storage was monitored through insoluble formation but also through reaction of nitrogen compounds known to be involved in the fuel degradation process. The influence of aging in injector fouling tendency was also investigated on an IDI engine on test bench. Various stabilizer additives (tertiary amines, dispersant...) were tested. Best results were obtained with dispersant which prevent sediment agglomeration making them able to cross the filter mesh. Additives limit indole evolution without inhibiting completely sediment formation, proving that other reactions take place. This paper shows that fuel oxidability is no modified by additives. None of the tested formulations is effective on fuel darkening. After aging, surfactants remain effective on injector fouling. Another way of improving the storage stability of Diesel fuel is hydrotreatment. A fuel was hydrotreated at different severity levels and the effect on stabilization was shown. It was demonstrated that hydrotreating makes it possible to achieve more complete stabilization than using additives. Particularly color stability is considerably improved after hydrotreatment. Stabilization was achieved for mild operating conditions for which hydrodenitrification is not complete, only indoles are transformed. To inhibitmore » fuel degradation, hydrotreatment should reduce other sediment precursors than nitrogen compounds. The authors demonstrated that hydrotreating renders fuels more sensitive to oxidation.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6003776
Report Number(s):
CONF-9010205--
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1990 Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) international fuels and lubricants conference and exposition, Tulsa, OK (United States), 22-25 Oct 1990; Other Information: Technical Paper SAE 902174
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; DIESEL FUELS; FUEL ADDITIVES; HYDROCRACKING; STORAGE; FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS; FOULING; AGING; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; AMINES; CATALYTIC CRACKING; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; SEDIMENTS; ADDITIVES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CONTROL; CRACKING; DECOMPOSITION; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUEL SYSTEMS; FUELS; GAS OILS; LIQUID FUELS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM FRACTIONS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; POLLUTION CONTROL; PYROLYSIS; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES 022000* -- Petroleum-- Transport, Handling, & Storage; 330102 -- Internal Combustion Engines-- Diesel; 020400 -- Petroleum-- Processing; 330700 -- Advanced Propulsion Systems-- Emission Control

Citation Formats

Martin, B., Bocard, C., Durand, J.P., Bigeard, P.H., Denis, J., Dorbon, M., and Bernasconi, C.. Long-term storage stability of diesel fuels. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Martin, B., Bocard, C., Durand, J.P., Bigeard, P.H., Denis, J., Dorbon, M., & Bernasconi, C.. Long-term storage stability of diesel fuels. United States.
Martin, B., Bocard, C., Durand, J.P., Bigeard, P.H., Denis, J., Dorbon, M., and Bernasconi, C.. 1990. "Long-term storage stability of diesel fuels". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6003776,
title = {Long-term storage stability of diesel fuels},
author = {Martin, B. and Bocard, C. and Durand, J.P. and Bigeard, P.H. and Denis, J. and Dorbon, M. and Bernasconi, C.},
abstractNote = {Storage stability of different diesel fuels containing cat-cracked stocks was examined using various aging conditions. The degradation of fuel during storage was monitored through insoluble formation but also through reaction of nitrogen compounds known to be involved in the fuel degradation process. The influence of aging in injector fouling tendency was also investigated on an IDI engine on test bench. Various stabilizer additives (tertiary amines, dispersant...) were tested. Best results were obtained with dispersant which prevent sediment agglomeration making them able to cross the filter mesh. Additives limit indole evolution without inhibiting completely sediment formation, proving that other reactions take place. This paper shows that fuel oxidability is no modified by additives. None of the tested formulations is effective on fuel darkening. After aging, surfactants remain effective on injector fouling. Another way of improving the storage stability of Diesel fuel is hydrotreatment. A fuel was hydrotreated at different severity levels and the effect on stabilization was shown. It was demonstrated that hydrotreating makes it possible to achieve more complete stabilization than using additives. Particularly color stability is considerably improved after hydrotreatment. Stabilization was achieved for mild operating conditions for which hydrodenitrification is not complete, only indoles are transformed. To inhibit fuel degradation, hydrotreatment should reduce other sediment precursors than nitrogen compounds. The authors demonstrated that hydrotreating renders fuels more sensitive to oxidation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 1
}

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