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Title: Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 82-234-1602, Black River Hardwood Company, Kingstree, South Carolina

Abstract

A health-hazard evaluation was conducted at Black River Hardwood Company, Kingstree, South Carolina in July, 1982. The evaluation was requested by the owner to investigate a possible excess of cancer among employees. There was concern that the company's water supply had been contaminated by agricultural chemicals buried in an adjacent lot in 1974. Environmental sampling data at the disposal site obtained by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) were reviewed. The cancer cases involved the stomach, gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and head and neck. The authors conclude that a cancer hazard among the employees does not exist. They recommend continued monitoring of the company and community water supply and using bottled drinking water until a municipal water system is available.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5997671
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5997671
Report Number(s):
PB-86-145331/XAB; HETA-82-234-1602
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; WASTE DISPOSAL; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; WATER POLLUTION; WATER SUPPLY; INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE; INSPECTION; NEOPLASMS; TOXICITY; WOOD PRODUCTS INDUSTRY; DISEASES; INDUSTRY; MANAGEMENT; MATERIALS; MEDICINE; POLLUTION; SAFETY; WASTE MANAGEMENT 552000* -- Public Health

Citation Formats

Salisbury, S., and Lybarger, J. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 82-234-1602, Black River Hardwood Company, Kingstree, South Carolina. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Salisbury, S., & Lybarger, J. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 82-234-1602, Black River Hardwood Company, Kingstree, South Carolina. United States.
Salisbury, S., and Lybarger, J. Sat . "Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 82-234-1602, Black River Hardwood Company, Kingstree, South Carolina". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5997671,
title = {Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 82-234-1602, Black River Hardwood Company, Kingstree, South Carolina},
author = {Salisbury, S. and Lybarger, J.},
abstractNote = {A health-hazard evaluation was conducted at Black River Hardwood Company, Kingstree, South Carolina in July, 1982. The evaluation was requested by the owner to investigate a possible excess of cancer among employees. There was concern that the company's water supply had been contaminated by agricultural chemicals buried in an adjacent lot in 1974. Environmental sampling data at the disposal site obtained by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) were reviewed. The cancer cases involved the stomach, gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and head and neck. The authors conclude that a cancer hazard among the employees does not exist. They recommend continued monitoring of the company and community water supply and using bottled drinking water until a municipal water system is available.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1985},
month = {Sat Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1985}
}

Technical Report:
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