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Title: Calcium sulfate crystallization along citrus root channels in a Florida soil exhibiting acid sulfate properties

Abstract

The authors observed euhedral crystals in Manatee soil in a citrus grove in St. Lucie County, Florida. The material was identified as gypsum (CaSO/sub 4/ /times/ 2H/sub 2/O) using x-ray diffraction and infrared spectra. Photomicrography and scanning electron microscopy revealed that gypsum accumulated both in old root channels and within citrus root tissue of the Btg horizon. The subsurface horizons had elevated sulfate levels, a low initial pH, a drop (0.5 unit) in pH upon air-drying. Electrical conductivity paralleled the concentration of water-soluble sulfate. High levels of calcium and sulfate occurred for horizons above the water table. This accumulation is attributed to groundwater bearing these ions and subsequently discharging them to the overlying soil. Dead citrus roots appear to act as wicks to aid water transfer from lower to higher horizons. The roots and their empty channels provide spaces in which the gypsum can precipitate if the concentrations of calcium and sulfate in the evaporating groundwater exceed the solubility product of gypsum.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5986867
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Soil Sci.; (United States); Journal Volume: 145:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GYPSUM; CRYSTALLIZATION; SOILS; CHEMICAL PROPERTIES; CITRUS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; FLORIDA; FRUIT TREES; PH VALUE; PHOTOMICROGRAPHY; ROOTS; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; ALKALINE EARTH METAL COMPOUNDS; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; CALCIUM SULFATES; ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; FEDERAL REGION IV; MAGNOLIOPHYTA; MAGNOLIOPSIDA; MICROSCOPY; MINERALS; NORTH AMERICA; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; PHOTOGRAPHY; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; PLANTS; SULFATE MINERALS; SULFATES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; TREES; USA; 510200* - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Syslo, S.K., Myhre, D.L., and Harris, W.G. Calcium sulfate crystallization along citrus root channels in a Florida soil exhibiting acid sulfate properties. United States: N. p., 1988. Web. doi:10.1097/00010694-198802000-00006.
Syslo, S.K., Myhre, D.L., & Harris, W.G. Calcium sulfate crystallization along citrus root channels in a Florida soil exhibiting acid sulfate properties. United States. doi:10.1097/00010694-198802000-00006.
Syslo, S.K., Myhre, D.L., and Harris, W.G. Mon . "Calcium sulfate crystallization along citrus root channels in a Florida soil exhibiting acid sulfate properties". United States. doi:10.1097/00010694-198802000-00006.
@article{osti_5986867,
title = {Calcium sulfate crystallization along citrus root channels in a Florida soil exhibiting acid sulfate properties},
author = {Syslo, S.K. and Myhre, D.L. and Harris, W.G.},
abstractNote = {The authors observed euhedral crystals in Manatee soil in a citrus grove in St. Lucie County, Florida. The material was identified as gypsum (CaSO/sub 4/ /times/ 2H/sub 2/O) using x-ray diffraction and infrared spectra. Photomicrography and scanning electron microscopy revealed that gypsum accumulated both in old root channels and within citrus root tissue of the Btg horizon. The subsurface horizons had elevated sulfate levels, a low initial pH, a drop (0.5 unit) in pH upon air-drying. Electrical conductivity paralleled the concentration of water-soluble sulfate. High levels of calcium and sulfate occurred for horizons above the water table. This accumulation is attributed to groundwater bearing these ions and subsequently discharging them to the overlying soil. Dead citrus roots appear to act as wicks to aid water transfer from lower to higher horizons. The roots and their empty channels provide spaces in which the gypsum can precipitate if the concentrations of calcium and sulfate in the evaporating groundwater exceed the solubility product of gypsum.},
doi = {10.1097/00010694-198802000-00006},
journal = {Soil Sci.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 145:2,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1988},
month = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1988}
}