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Title: Displaying and evaluating engineering properties and natural hazards using geomorphic mapping techniques: Telluride, Colorado

Abstract

Telluride, located in the San Juan mountains of southwestern Colorado, is situated in a glacially carved, fluvially modified alpine valley. Today this chic setting is experiencing rapid urban development resulting from flourishing tourist traffic during both the winter ski season and the summer vacation period. A new development, Mountain Village, is being built on an extensive and complex landslide that has only received superficial scrutiny. Recent fast growth is placing considerable pressure on pristine, undeveloped land. This timely quandary incorporates the interaction between prospective development, geomorphic processes, engineering factors, economic feasibility, and landuse adjudication. In an attempt to respond to these issues the State of Colorado enacted Senate Bill 35 (1972) and House Bills 1034 (1974) and 1041 (1974), all mandating assessment of the natural hazards of an area, preparatory to development. The key to evaluating the natural hazards is to comprehend the geomorphic processes. The area is highly-faulted with associated mineralization. Whereas the upper slopes are composed of massive rhyodacitic-tuff breccias and flows, the valley is sculpted from shales, sandstones, and conglomerates. Several periods of glaciation occurred in the area. Glacial till, talus slopes, avalanche chutes and cones, rock glaciers, alluvium, and landslides have been identified in the fieldmore » and mapped on aerial photographs. Many of the slopes in the area are active. The authors have constructed a geomorphic map (1:12,500) that shows geology, landforms, geomorphic processes and engineering properties. This map can be used by regulatory agencies in identifying areas of natural hazards potentially sensitive to development.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Geography Dept.)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5975924
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5975924
Report Number(s):
CONF-921058--
Journal ID: ISSN 0016-7592; CODEN: GAAPBC
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs; (United States); Journal Volume: 24:7; Conference: 1992 annual meeting of the Geological Society of America (GSA), Cincinnati, OH (United States), 26-29 Oct 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; COLORADO; LAND USE; VALLEYS; MAPPING; CONSTRUCTION; ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; GEOLOGIC FORMATIONS; GEOMORPHOLOGY; HAZARDS; LANDSLIDES; MAPS; PLANNING; SAFETY ENGINEERING; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; ENGINEERING; GEOLOGY; NORTH AMERICA; USA 540250* -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Site Resource & Use Studies-- (1990-); 580000 -- Geosciences

Citation Formats

Gunawan, I., Giardino, J.R., and Tchakerian, V.P.. Displaying and evaluating engineering properties and natural hazards using geomorphic mapping techniques: Telluride, Colorado. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Gunawan, I., Giardino, J.R., & Tchakerian, V.P.. Displaying and evaluating engineering properties and natural hazards using geomorphic mapping techniques: Telluride, Colorado. United States.
Gunawan, I., Giardino, J.R., and Tchakerian, V.P.. Wed . "Displaying and evaluating engineering properties and natural hazards using geomorphic mapping techniques: Telluride, Colorado". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5975924,
title = {Displaying and evaluating engineering properties and natural hazards using geomorphic mapping techniques: Telluride, Colorado},
author = {Gunawan, I. and Giardino, J.R. and Tchakerian, V.P.},
abstractNote = {Telluride, located in the San Juan mountains of southwestern Colorado, is situated in a glacially carved, fluvially modified alpine valley. Today this chic setting is experiencing rapid urban development resulting from flourishing tourist traffic during both the winter ski season and the summer vacation period. A new development, Mountain Village, is being built on an extensive and complex landslide that has only received superficial scrutiny. Recent fast growth is placing considerable pressure on pristine, undeveloped land. This timely quandary incorporates the interaction between prospective development, geomorphic processes, engineering factors, economic feasibility, and landuse adjudication. In an attempt to respond to these issues the State of Colorado enacted Senate Bill 35 (1972) and House Bills 1034 (1974) and 1041 (1974), all mandating assessment of the natural hazards of an area, preparatory to development. The key to evaluating the natural hazards is to comprehend the geomorphic processes. The area is highly-faulted with associated mineralization. Whereas the upper slopes are composed of massive rhyodacitic-tuff breccias and flows, the valley is sculpted from shales, sandstones, and conglomerates. Several periods of glaciation occurred in the area. Glacial till, talus slopes, avalanche chutes and cones, rock glaciers, alluvium, and landslides have been identified in the field and mapped on aerial photographs. Many of the slopes in the area are active. The authors have constructed a geomorphic map (1:12,500) that shows geology, landforms, geomorphic processes and engineering properties. This map can be used by regulatory agencies in identifying areas of natural hazards potentially sensitive to development.},
doi = {},
journal = {Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 24:7,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992}
}

Conference:
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