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Title: Anaesthetic properties of carbon monoxide and other gases in relation to plants, insects, and centipedes

Abstract

The anaesthetic effect of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, propylene, butylene, ethylene, and acetylene, when mixed with oxygen, was tested on ten different species of insects and centipedes. The lowest concentrations found to cause anaesthesia are given in per cent by volume as follows: propylene, for centipede, 30; katydid, 75; rose chafer, 60. Carbon monoxide, for centipede, 81.5; katydid, 89, rose chafer, 85. Butylene, for centipede, 5; katydid, 10; rose chafer, 40. Ethylene or acetylene, for centipede, katydid, and rose chafer, 100. Carbon dioxide, for rose chafer, 30. Ethylene was the most effective plant anaesthetic, 0.0005 per cent stopping growth movements of tomato and sunflower plants as shown by motion pictures; 0.001 per cent stopped elongation of sweet pea seedlings, while 0.00001 per cent retarded elongation nearly 50 per cent. The degree of retardation in growth from ethylene gas varied with the concentration and the plant species. Acetylene and propylene were about equally effective as plant anaesthetics. Both were approximately 10 times as effective as carbon monoxide. Mimosa pudica lost its capacity to respond to external stimuli while being exposed to 0.25 per cent of carbon monoxide, but became normal again upon being removed from the gas. 3 references, 4 tables.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Boyce Thompson Inst. for Plant Research, Inc., Yonkers, NY
OSTI Identifier:
5969037
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5969037
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Contrib. Boyce Thompson Inst.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ACETYLENE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BUTENES; CARBON DIOXIDE; CARBON MONOXIDE; ETHYLENE; PROPYLENE; ANESTHETICS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; INSECTS; PLANTS; ALKENES; ALKYNES; ANIMALS; ARTHROPODS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DEPRESSANTS; CHALCOGENIDES; DATA; DRUGS; HYDROCARBONS; INFORMATION; INVERTEBRATES; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS 560303* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology-- Plants-- (-1987); 560304 -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology-- Invertebrates-- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Zimmerman, P.W. Anaesthetic properties of carbon monoxide and other gases in relation to plants, insects, and centipedes. United States: N. p., 1935. Web.
Zimmerman, P.W. Anaesthetic properties of carbon monoxide and other gases in relation to plants, insects, and centipedes. United States.
Zimmerman, P.W. Tue . "Anaesthetic properties of carbon monoxide and other gases in relation to plants, insects, and centipedes". United States.
@article{osti_5969037,
title = {Anaesthetic properties of carbon monoxide and other gases in relation to plants, insects, and centipedes},
author = {Zimmerman, P.W.},
abstractNote = {The anaesthetic effect of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, propylene, butylene, ethylene, and acetylene, when mixed with oxygen, was tested on ten different species of insects and centipedes. The lowest concentrations found to cause anaesthesia are given in per cent by volume as follows: propylene, for centipede, 30; katydid, 75; rose chafer, 60. Carbon monoxide, for centipede, 81.5; katydid, 89, rose chafer, 85. Butylene, for centipede, 5; katydid, 10; rose chafer, 40. Ethylene or acetylene, for centipede, katydid, and rose chafer, 100. Carbon dioxide, for rose chafer, 30. Ethylene was the most effective plant anaesthetic, 0.0005 per cent stopping growth movements of tomato and sunflower plants as shown by motion pictures; 0.001 per cent stopped elongation of sweet pea seedlings, while 0.00001 per cent retarded elongation nearly 50 per cent. The degree of retardation in growth from ethylene gas varied with the concentration and the plant species. Acetylene and propylene were about equally effective as plant anaesthetics. Both were approximately 10 times as effective as carbon monoxide. Mimosa pudica lost its capacity to respond to external stimuli while being exposed to 0.25 per cent of carbon monoxide, but became normal again upon being removed from the gas. 3 references, 4 tables.},
doi = {},
journal = {Contrib. Boyce Thompson Inst.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 7:2,
place = {United States},
year = {1935},
month = {1}
}