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Title: Maintaining nutritional adequacy during a prolonged food crisis. [Basic foods for post-nuclear attack use]

Abstract

This handbook is the first to assemble nutritional information and make recommendations on the efficient use of unprocessed grains, beans, and other elemental foods during the aftermath of a nuclear war. These basic foods would constitute the main resources to combat famine after a major nuclear attack. Such an attack would reduce and probably eliminate most commercial food processing for many months. To decision makers, this handbook should prove useful on basic aspects of nutrition in a long-term survival situation. These decision makers might range from the heads of families to government officials. Recommendations for nutrition given by organizations experienced in crisis feeding are reviewed and compared. Based on the best nutritional information available, emergency dietary recommendations are made for minimum and intermediate goals. The emergency dietary recommendations are applied to food for practical survival rations. Long-term survival rations for Americans are evaluated. These rations are (1) ten single-food rations; (2) four cereal-legume rations, ratio 4:1; (3) four cereal-legume rations, ratio 8:1; and (4) four cereal-legume-dry milk rations. The 22 different survival rations are detailed and summarized in 20 tables which list their nutritional adequacies and deficiences. Expedient procedures are given by which basic foods may be processed and cookedmore » to provide a more healthful diet than most Americans believe possible. Special attention is given to the requirements of infants, children, and pregnant or lactating women. The eleven appendixes provide a wealth of specialized information. Among these appendixes is one that summarizes new and improved expedient methods for removing radioactive fallout and other contaminants from water. Another appendix is a comprehensive account of ways to sprout seeds to produce vitamins and improve palatability. (ERB)« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5968023
Report Number(s):
ORNL-5352
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-26
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CIVIL DEFENSE; EMERGENCY PLAN; DIET; DATA COMPILATION; FOOD; HUMAN POPULATIONS; NUTRITION; DECISION MAKING; MANUALS; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; TABLES; WARFARE; DATA; DATA FORMS; DOCUMENT TYPES; EXPLOSIONS; INFORMATION; NATIONAL DEFENSE; NUMERICAL DATA; POPULATIONS; SAFETY; WEAPONS; 990500* - Civilian Defense- (-1987); 553000 - Agriculture & Food Technology

Citation Formats

Franz, K. B., and Kearny, C. H. Maintaining nutritional adequacy during a prolonged food crisis. [Basic foods for post-nuclear attack use]. United States: N. p., 1979. Web. doi:10.2172/5968023.
Franz, K. B., & Kearny, C. H. Maintaining nutritional adequacy during a prolonged food crisis. [Basic foods for post-nuclear attack use]. United States. doi:10.2172/5968023.
Franz, K. B., and Kearny, C. H. Wed . "Maintaining nutritional adequacy during a prolonged food crisis. [Basic foods for post-nuclear attack use]". United States. doi:10.2172/5968023. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5968023.
@article{osti_5968023,
title = {Maintaining nutritional adequacy during a prolonged food crisis. [Basic foods for post-nuclear attack use]},
author = {Franz, K. B. and Kearny, C. H.},
abstractNote = {This handbook is the first to assemble nutritional information and make recommendations on the efficient use of unprocessed grains, beans, and other elemental foods during the aftermath of a nuclear war. These basic foods would constitute the main resources to combat famine after a major nuclear attack. Such an attack would reduce and probably eliminate most commercial food processing for many months. To decision makers, this handbook should prove useful on basic aspects of nutrition in a long-term survival situation. These decision makers might range from the heads of families to government officials. Recommendations for nutrition given by organizations experienced in crisis feeding are reviewed and compared. Based on the best nutritional information available, emergency dietary recommendations are made for minimum and intermediate goals. The emergency dietary recommendations are applied to food for practical survival rations. Long-term survival rations for Americans are evaluated. These rations are (1) ten single-food rations; (2) four cereal-legume rations, ratio 4:1; (3) four cereal-legume rations, ratio 8:1; and (4) four cereal-legume-dry milk rations. The 22 different survival rations are detailed and summarized in 20 tables which list their nutritional adequacies and deficiences. Expedient procedures are given by which basic foods may be processed and cooked to provide a more healthful diet than most Americans believe possible. Special attention is given to the requirements of infants, children, and pregnant or lactating women. The eleven appendixes provide a wealth of specialized information. Among these appendixes is one that summarizes new and improved expedient methods for removing radioactive fallout and other contaminants from water. Another appendix is a comprehensive account of ways to sprout seeds to produce vitamins and improve palatability. (ERB)},
doi = {10.2172/5968023},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {8}
}